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WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [name] => communications-strategy-tool-kit-podcasting-public-affairs [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog ) [query_vars] => Array ( [name] => communications-strategy-tool-kit-podcasting-public-affairs [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [tag] => [cat] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => [order] => DESC ) [tax_query] => [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( ) [relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5520 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2021-08-24 17:09:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-08-24 17:09:41 [post_content] => The rapidly growing realm of podcasting is shifting the world of public affairs and policy. Now, there’s a new way to reach your audience, whether it's advocates, stakeholders, or public officials. There’s no advocacy, no change in policy, without an effective communications strategy. Along with your emails, events, and social media, podcasting introduces a new way to reach your audiences. People are craving human connections, and they need to hear the reasons and opinions of varying perspectives that represent America’s diversity. If you want to encourage people to wholeheartedly involve themselves in your advocacy efforts, you need to establish that one-on-one connection. That’s how your audience will understand why your issues matter and why their voice is necessary. Of course, you can’t meet with every single person in your target audience to establish that connection. But, you can offer the next best thing: a podcast that includes them as if they were in the room with you, having that conversation.

Podcasts are one of the most effective communications tools.

There’s a reason why over half the population is now listening to podcasts. Podcasting is one of the most intimate communications tools in a socially distanced world — one that’s becoming even more acclimated to remote conversations. Listening to a podcast feels like a personal conversation. Susie Warhurst of Acast explains it perfectly: “A podcast isn’t a public broadcast or announcement — it’s a personal conversation that a listener has actively chosen to be a part of at that very moment. This closeness, and the level of trust that comes with it, is why the most important relationship in all of podcasting is that between the creator and the listener.” Podcasts also allow you to pack a lot of content into one episode, content that may be too much to consume through written or video format. The beauty of podcasts is that people listen to audio content while doing other tasks. Whether it’s their daily commute, washing dishes, or their afternoon walk, people prefer taking their podcasts with them. What about the issues that matter to your organization? Podcasts give you the chance to host guest speakers with varying perspectives and backgrounds that make space for well-rounded discussions in today’s America. This means your listeners get to establish a trusting relationship with your organization and the key players in your field.

Public Affairs and advocacy groups can reach their target audiences through different podcast formats.

Your organization might have several target audiences, each with varying levels of awareness. Different podcast formats give you the freedom to focus on one of these targets or on your entire audience, regardless of their awareness level. Some organizations produce their podcasts to contain relevant information and stories about their advocacy to educate new audiences about the issues at hand. Other organizations specifically craft their podcasts as an internal communications method for members who are on the frontlines of advocacy and policy efforts. With this approach, they keep their members informed about relevant news, updates, and policy changes. You can even reach your audience beyond the traditional podcast platforms. Some virtual recording studios, such as Voxtopica Digital Studios, allow podcasters to reach 1,000 public audience members during live-streamed podcast discussions, giving the audience an even more human-to-human connection to your organization. [callout align="left" heading="Educate Your Advocates with Content in Your Action Center" button_text="Learn about Quorum Grassroots" button_link="https://www.quorum.us/solutions/grassroots-advocacy/"] Once you decide who your podcast is for, you get to decide what kind of format you’ll use to reach them. There’s so much room to think outside of the box when it comes to crafting your podcast. Here are a few examples of what you can do:
  • Narrative Series: If your goal is to educate or inform your audience about the big picture, a narrative series is a great option. This kind of podcast is an excellent way to share the stories of those impacted by advocacy efforts, the history of your field, or the values your organization prioritizes. This format edits recorded interviews and conversations into narrative stories, offering important perspectives on a topic that can reveal how policy affects the daily lives of others and why that might need change.
  • Interview Talk Show: If you want to discuss real-time updates and developments in your field, consider this format. Talk shows are particularly effective for those who are already involved in your organization and want to stay updated on where the field is heading.
  •  Live Event Recording: These can be integrated into a talk show, series, or as a stand-alone show. If your organization hosts a conference, recording live can be a great way to unify your audience after the event is over. Some organizations will have stand-alone interviews that are recorded at the live event, but only available through the podcast after the event.
When it comes to choosing which format, always consider your listener and the goals of your podcast first.

Today, having a podcast matters more than ever.

Podcasts are officially part of the mainstream content ecosystem. When it comes time to pitch a podcast to your team, here’s some data to help:
  • 41% of the population say they’ve listened to at least one podcast in the last month.
  • 28% say they’ve listened to at least one podcast in the last week.
This means you have the chance of reaching at least 41% of your target audience through a podcast. Putting out a podcast is no longer a gamble. The data shows that people will listen. Podcast listeners also aren’t just committed to one show, but on average listen to 8 episodes a week, 5 shows a week. [stat align="right" number="8" text="The average number of podcasts a listener consumes in a week."] You know that people will listen—but who are these listeners? This is where podcasts stand out from other content forms. Podcast listeners are more diverse than America’s population. Audiences are evenly split between men and women, and non-white audiences are growing faster than white audiences. This means your podcast has the potential to reach the total breadth of your target audience, reaching the different demographics of this country. At the end of the day, the data from Nielsen and the Infinite Dial 2021 shows that podcasts are here to stay. It’s time to get creative with your communications, share the stories of the people you advocate for, and deepen the connections with your audience. If you’re ready to see how a podcast can change how your organization reaches people, you can contact the experts at Voxtopica at hello@voxtopica.com. [post_title] => A New Communications Strategy for Your Tool Kit: How Podcasting Is Changing Public Affairs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => communications-strategy-tool-kit-podcasting-public-affairs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-08-26 18:29:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-08-26 18:29:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.quorum.us/?post_type=resources&p=5520 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [queried_object_id] => 5520 [request] => SELECT wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND wp_posts.post_name = 'communications-strategy-tool-kit-podcasting-public-affairs' AND wp_posts.post_type = 'resources' ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5520 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2021-08-24 17:09:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-08-24 17:09:41 [post_content] => The rapidly growing realm of podcasting is shifting the world of public affairs and policy. Now, there’s a new way to reach your audience, whether it's advocates, stakeholders, or public officials. There’s no advocacy, no change in policy, without an effective communications strategy. Along with your emails, events, and social media, podcasting introduces a new way to reach your audiences. People are craving human connections, and they need to hear the reasons and opinions of varying perspectives that represent America’s diversity. If you want to encourage people to wholeheartedly involve themselves in your advocacy efforts, you need to establish that one-on-one connection. That’s how your audience will understand why your issues matter and why their voice is necessary. Of course, you can’t meet with every single person in your target audience to establish that connection. But, you can offer the next best thing: a podcast that includes them as if they were in the room with you, having that conversation.

Podcasts are one of the most effective communications tools.

There’s a reason why over half the population is now listening to podcasts. Podcasting is one of the most intimate communications tools in a socially distanced world — one that’s becoming even more acclimated to remote conversations. Listening to a podcast feels like a personal conversation. Susie Warhurst of Acast explains it perfectly: “A podcast isn’t a public broadcast or announcement — it’s a personal conversation that a listener has actively chosen to be a part of at that very moment. This closeness, and the level of trust that comes with it, is why the most important relationship in all of podcasting is that between the creator and the listener.” Podcasts also allow you to pack a lot of content into one episode, content that may be too much to consume through written or video format. The beauty of podcasts is that people listen to audio content while doing other tasks. Whether it’s their daily commute, washing dishes, or their afternoon walk, people prefer taking their podcasts with them. What about the issues that matter to your organization? Podcasts give you the chance to host guest speakers with varying perspectives and backgrounds that make space for well-rounded discussions in today’s America. This means your listeners get to establish a trusting relationship with your organization and the key players in your field.

Public Affairs and advocacy groups can reach their target audiences through different podcast formats.

Your organization might have several target audiences, each with varying levels of awareness. Different podcast formats give you the freedom to focus on one of these targets or on your entire audience, regardless of their awareness level. Some organizations produce their podcasts to contain relevant information and stories about their advocacy to educate new audiences about the issues at hand. Other organizations specifically craft their podcasts as an internal communications method for members who are on the frontlines of advocacy and policy efforts. With this approach, they keep their members informed about relevant news, updates, and policy changes. You can even reach your audience beyond the traditional podcast platforms. Some virtual recording studios, such as Voxtopica Digital Studios, allow podcasters to reach 1,000 public audience members during live-streamed podcast discussions, giving the audience an even more human-to-human connection to your organization. [callout align="left" heading="Educate Your Advocates with Content in Your Action Center" button_text="Learn about Quorum Grassroots" button_link="https://www.quorum.us/solutions/grassroots-advocacy/"] Once you decide who your podcast is for, you get to decide what kind of format you’ll use to reach them. There’s so much room to think outside of the box when it comes to crafting your podcast. Here are a few examples of what you can do:
  • Narrative Series: If your goal is to educate or inform your audience about the big picture, a narrative series is a great option. This kind of podcast is an excellent way to share the stories of those impacted by advocacy efforts, the history of your field, or the values your organization prioritizes. This format edits recorded interviews and conversations into narrative stories, offering important perspectives on a topic that can reveal how policy affects the daily lives of others and why that might need change.
  • Interview Talk Show: If you want to discuss real-time updates and developments in your field, consider this format. Talk shows are particularly effective for those who are already involved in your organization and want to stay updated on where the field is heading.
  •  Live Event Recording: These can be integrated into a talk show, series, or as a stand-alone show. If your organization hosts a conference, recording live can be a great way to unify your audience after the event is over. Some organizations will have stand-alone interviews that are recorded at the live event, but only available through the podcast after the event.
When it comes to choosing which format, always consider your listener and the goals of your podcast first.

Today, having a podcast matters more than ever.

Podcasts are officially part of the mainstream content ecosystem. When it comes time to pitch a podcast to your team, here’s some data to help:
  • 41% of the population say they’ve listened to at least one podcast in the last month.
  • 28% say they’ve listened to at least one podcast in the last week.
This means you have the chance of reaching at least 41% of your target audience through a podcast. Putting out a podcast is no longer a gamble. The data shows that people will listen. Podcast listeners also aren’t just committed to one show, but on average listen to 8 episodes a week, 5 shows a week. [stat align="right" number="8" text="The average number of podcasts a listener consumes in a week."] You know that people will listen—but who are these listeners? This is where podcasts stand out from other content forms. Podcast listeners are more diverse than America’s population. Audiences are evenly split between men and women, and non-white audiences are growing faster than white audiences. This means your podcast has the potential to reach the total breadth of your target audience, reaching the different demographics of this country. At the end of the day, the data from Nielsen and the Infinite Dial 2021 shows that podcasts are here to stay. It’s time to get creative with your communications, share the stories of the people you advocate for, and deepen the connections with your audience. If you’re ready to see how a podcast can change how your organization reaches people, you can contact the experts at Voxtopica at hello@voxtopica.com. [post_title] => A New Communications Strategy for Your Tool Kit: How Podcasting Is Changing Public Affairs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => communications-strategy-tool-kit-podcasting-public-affairs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-08-26 18:29:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-08-26 18:29:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.quorum.us/?post_type=resources&p=5520 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 1 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5520 [post_author] => 12 [post_date] => 2021-08-24 17:09:41 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-08-24 17:09:41 [post_content] => The rapidly growing realm of podcasting is shifting the world of public affairs and policy. Now, there’s a new way to reach your audience, whether it's advocates, stakeholders, or public officials. There’s no advocacy, no change in policy, without an effective communications strategy. Along with your emails, events, and social media, podcasting introduces a new way to reach your audiences. People are craving human connections, and they need to hear the reasons and opinions of varying perspectives that represent America’s diversity. If you want to encourage people to wholeheartedly involve themselves in your advocacy efforts, you need to establish that one-on-one connection. That’s how your audience will understand why your issues matter and why their voice is necessary. Of course, you can’t meet with every single person in your target audience to establish that connection. But, you can offer the next best thing: a podcast that includes them as if they were in the room with you, having that conversation.

Podcasts are one of the most effective communications tools.

There’s a reason why over half the population is now listening to podcasts. Podcasting is one of the most intimate communications tools in a socially distanced world — one that’s becoming even more acclimated to remote conversations. Listening to a podcast feels like a personal conversation. Susie Warhurst of Acast explains it perfectly: “A podcast isn’t a public broadcast or announcement — it’s a personal conversation that a listener has actively chosen to be a part of at that very moment. This closeness, and the level of trust that comes with it, is why the most important relationship in all of podcasting is that between the creator and the listener.” Podcasts also allow you to pack a lot of content into one episode, content that may be too much to consume through written or video format. The beauty of podcasts is that people listen to audio content while doing other tasks. Whether it’s their daily commute, washing dishes, or their afternoon walk, people prefer taking their podcasts with them. What about the issues that matter to your organization? Podcasts give you the chance to host guest speakers with varying perspectives and backgrounds that make space for well-rounded discussions in today’s America. This means your listeners get to establish a trusting relationship with your organization and the key players in your field.

Public Affairs and advocacy groups can reach their target audiences through different podcast formats.

Your organization might have several target audiences, each with varying levels of awareness. Different podcast formats give you the freedom to focus on one of these targets or on your entire audience, regardless of their awareness level. Some organizations produce their podcasts to contain relevant information and stories about their advocacy to educate new audiences about the issues at hand. Other organizations specifically craft their podcasts as an internal communications method for members who are on the frontlines of advocacy and policy efforts. With this approach, they keep their members informed about relevant news, updates, and policy changes. You can even reach your audience beyond the traditional podcast platforms. Some virtual recording studios, such as Voxtopica Digital Studios, allow podcasters to reach 1,000 public audience members during live-streamed podcast discussions, giving the audience an even more human-to-human connection to your organization. [callout align="left" heading="Educate Your Advocates with Content in Your Action Center" button_text="Learn about Quorum Grassroots" button_link="https://www.quorum.us/solutions/grassroots-advocacy/"] Once you decide who your podcast is for, you get to decide what kind of format you’ll use to reach them. There’s so much room to think outside of the box when it comes to crafting your podcast. Here are a few examples of what you can do:
  • Narrative Series: If your goal is to educate or inform your audience about the big picture, a narrative series is a great option. This kind of podcast is an excellent way to share the stories of those impacted by advocacy efforts, the history of your field, or the values your organization prioritizes. This format edits recorded interviews and conversations into narrative stories, offering important perspectives on a topic that can reveal how policy affects the daily lives of others and why that might need change.
  • Interview Talk Show: If you want to discuss real-time updates and developments in your field, consider this format. Talk shows are particularly effective for those who are already involved in your organization and want to stay updated on where the field is heading.
  •  Live Event Recording: These can be integrated into a talk show, series, or as a stand-alone show. If your organization hosts a conference, recording live can be a great way to unify your audience after the event is over. Some organizations will have stand-alone interviews that are recorded at the live event, but only available through the podcast after the event.
When it comes to choosing which format, always consider your listener and the goals of your podcast first.

Today, having a podcast matters more than ever.

Podcasts are officially part of the mainstream content ecosystem. When it comes time to pitch a podcast to your team, here’s some data to help:
  • 41% of the population say they’ve listened to at least one podcast in the last month.
  • 28% say they’ve listened to at least one podcast in the last week.
This means you have the chance of reaching at least 41% of your target audience through a podcast. Putting out a podcast is no longer a gamble. The data shows that people will listen. Podcast listeners also aren’t just committed to one show, but on average listen to 8 episodes a week, 5 shows a week. [stat align="right" number="8" text="The average number of podcasts a listener consumes in a week."] You know that people will listen—but who are these listeners? This is where podcasts stand out from other content forms. Podcast listeners are more diverse than America’s population. Audiences are evenly split between men and women, and non-white audiences are growing faster than white audiences. This means your podcast has the potential to reach the total breadth of your target audience, reaching the different demographics of this country. At the end of the day, the data from Nielsen and the Infinite Dial 2021 shows that podcasts are here to stay. It’s time to get creative with your communications, share the stories of the people you advocate for, and deepen the connections with your audience. If you’re ready to see how a podcast can change how your organization reaches people, you can contact the experts at Voxtopica at hello@voxtopica.com. [post_title] => A New Communications Strategy for Your Tool Kit: How Podcasting Is Changing Public Affairs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => communications-strategy-tool-kit-podcasting-public-affairs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-08-26 18:29:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-08-26 18:29:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.quorum.us/?post_type=resources&p=5520 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 1 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => 1 [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => 1 [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 51bdf45464160d43cfb0eeccb325cd1e [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
!!! 5520
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A New Communications Strategy for Your Tool Kit: How Podcasting Is Changing Public Affairs

A New Communications Strategy for Your Tool Kit: How Podcasting Is Changing Public Affairs

The rapidly growing realm of podcasting is shifting the world of public affairs and policy. Now, there’s a new way to reach your audience, whether it’s advocates, stakeholders, or public officials.

There’s no advocacy, no change in policy, without an effective communications strategy. Along with your emails, events, and social media, podcasting introduces a new way to reach your audiences. People are craving human connections, and they need to hear the reasons and opinions of varying perspectives that represent America’s diversity.

If you want to encourage people to wholeheartedly involve themselves in your advocacy efforts, you need to establish that one-on-one connection. That’s how your audience will understand why your issues matter and why their voice is necessary.

Of course, you can’t meet with every single person in your target audience to establish that connection. But, you can offer the next best thing: a podcast that includes them as if they were in the room with you, having that conversation.

Podcasts are one of the most effective communications tools.

There’s a reason why over half the population is now listening to podcasts. Podcasting is one of the most intimate communications tools in a socially distanced world — one that’s becoming even more acclimated to remote conversations.

Listening to a podcast feels like a personal conversation. Susie Warhurst of Acast explains it perfectly:

“A podcast isn’t a public broadcast or announcement — it’s a personal conversation that a listener has actively chosen to be a part of at that very moment. This closeness, and the level of trust that comes with it, is why the most important relationship in all of podcasting is that between the creator and the listener.”

Podcasts also allow you to pack a lot of content into one episode, content that may be too much to consume through written or video format. The beauty of podcasts is that people listen to audio content while doing other tasks. Whether it’s their daily commute, washing dishes, or their afternoon walk, people prefer taking their podcasts with them.

What about the issues that matter to your organization? Podcasts give you the chance to host guest speakers with varying perspectives and backgrounds that make space for well-rounded discussions in today’s America. This means your listeners get to establish a trusting relationship with your organization and the key players in your field.

Public Affairs and advocacy groups can reach their target audiences through different podcast formats.

Your organization might have several target audiences, each with varying levels of awareness. Different podcast formats give you the freedom to focus on one of these targets or on your entire audience, regardless of their awareness level. Some organizations produce their podcasts to contain relevant information and stories about their advocacy to educate new audiences about the issues at hand. Other organizations specifically craft their podcasts as an internal communications method for members who are on the frontlines of advocacy and policy efforts. With this approach, they keep their members informed about relevant news, updates, and policy changes.

You can even reach your audience beyond the traditional podcast platforms. Some virtual recording studios, such as Voxtopica Digital Studios, allow podcasters to reach 1,000 public audience members during live-streamed podcast discussions, giving the audience an even more human-to-human connection to your organization.

Once you decide who your podcast is for, you get to decide what kind of format you’ll use to reach them. There’s so much room to think outside of the box when it comes to crafting your podcast. Here are a few examples of what you can do:

  • Narrative Series: If your goal is to educate or inform your audience about the big picture, a narrative series is a great option. This kind of podcast is an excellent way to share the stories of those impacted by advocacy efforts, the history of your field, or the values your organization prioritizes. This format edits recorded interviews and conversations into narrative stories, offering important perspectives on a topic that can reveal how policy affects the daily lives of others and why that might need change.
  • Interview Talk Show: If you want to discuss real-time updates and developments in your field, consider this format. Talk shows are particularly effective for those who are already involved in your organization and want to stay updated on where the field is heading.
  •  Live Event Recording: These can be integrated into a talk show, series, or as a stand-alone show. If your organization hosts a conference, recording live can be a great way to unify your audience after the event is over. Some organizations will have stand-alone interviews that are recorded at the live event, but only available through the podcast after the event.

When it comes to choosing which format, always consider your listener and the goals of your podcast first.

Today, having a podcast matters more than ever.

Podcasts are officially part of the mainstream content ecosystem. When it comes time to pitch a podcast to your team, here’s some data to help:

  • 41% of the population say they’ve listened to at least one podcast in the last month.
  • 28% say they’ve listened to at least one podcast in the last week.

This means you have the chance of reaching at least 41% of your target audience through a podcast. Putting out a podcast is no longer a gamble. The data shows that people will listen. Podcast listeners also aren’t just committed to one show, but on average listen to 8 episodes a week, 5 shows a week.

8
The average number of podcasts a listener consumes in a week.

You know that people will listen—but who are these listeners? This is where podcasts stand out from other content forms. Podcast listeners are more diverse than America’s population. Audiences are evenly split between men and women, and non-white audiences are growing faster than white audiences. This means your podcast has the potential to reach the total breadth of your target audience, reaching the different demographics of this country.

At the end of the day, the data from Nielsen and the Infinite Dial 2021 shows that podcasts are here to stay. It’s time to get creative with your communications, share the stories of the people you advocate for, and deepen the connections with your audience.

If you’re ready to see how a podcast can change how your organization reaches people, you can contact the experts at Voxtopica at hello@voxtopica.com.

Voxtopica is a boutique creative agency that provides podcast production, distribution, and marketing services.

Based in Washington, D.C., we focus on creating outstanding audio content for subject matter experts and the organizations that support them.