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WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [name] => esg-strategy-stakeholders-love [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog ) [query_vars] => Array ( [name] => esg-strategy-stakeholders-love [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [tag] => [cat] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => [order] => DESC ) [tax_query] => [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( ) [relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5327 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2021-06-24 14:53:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-24 14:53:11 [post_content] => With consumers and investors increasingly more mindful of corporate responsibility initiatives, ESG — Environmental, Social, Governance — has become a way for the public to measure how corporations bring about positive change. If your company is looking to start making a difference with its own ESG strategy, you may not know where to start. We’ve put together some helpful tips to incorporate an ESG strategy into your company.

What does ESG mean?

ESG — Environmental, Social, Governance — is a form of corporate investment centered on corporate social responsibility. These initiatives fall into one of three categories: Environment—Environmental initiatives that lighten a corporation's impact on the planet. This could be an investment in clean energy, improving the sustainability of a company’s supply chain, or offsetting business carbon emissions. Social — Seeks to strengthen a corporation's positive impact on society. This can mean building inclusion and diversity initiatives internally, investing in community improvement projects, or donating to social justice organizations. Governance — Improves the processes and hierarchical structures used to manage a corporation. Usually, governance initiatives seek to answer the question, how is a corporation positioning itself to bring about positive change? This could mean increasing internal pay transparency or diversifying executive leadership.

Why is ESG important?

ESG strategies can also be a way to boost business. With investors and consumers more conscious in buying from companies whose values align with their own, ESG is a way to expand corporate accountability beyond the boardroom. Displaying ESG progress with metrics to the public helps boost how conscious consumers perceive your corporation. ESG strategy is the avenue in which large corporations contribute to social good. This concept has become more popular as the public has put increasing pressure on corporations to use their vast resources and connections for the greater good. Corporations often promote their ESG initiatives to the public, making reporting crucial to prove ESG initiatives are working. This also includes reports delivered to the independent, impartial review boards that evaluate ESG initiative effectiveness.

How to Execute a Successful ESG Strategy

No matter what category of ESG your company decides to engage in, we’ve laid out some steps to set your ESG strategy up for success.

1. Align to company core values and beliefs

Before launching your ESG initiative, consider your corporate values and beliefs when deciding which initiatives to adopt. This ensures that the initiatives you create will harmonize with your established brand.

2. Select your initiatives

Once you’ve taken your company values into consideration, decide what you want your initiative to be. First, you’ll need to determine your budget for your initiative. You can then either poll your organization internally for project ideas or consider the communities your organization works in and the needs of that community when sketching out your project. When deciding which organizations, communities, or projects to take on, build a matrix, like the one we’ve created below, to help you evaluate project potential.

3. Consider your stakeholders from the organization or issue area you’ve selected

It’s important that your initiatives are informed by experts from the organizations you choose based on the above matrix. This gives you the best chance to improve an existing problem with your work. Your stakeholders can be those who help craft your ESG strategy or those who respond to the work you’ve done. Consider these stakeholders: Consumers: You’ll want to communicate your progress to prove your corporation is sparking positive change. These stakeholders will respond by choosing to purchase your corporation’s goods or services. Issue experts: Consult with experts on your ESG initiative subject matter to inform how you’ll execute your efforts and maximize your impact. Legislators: You’ll want to keep your elected officials informed to build a positive reputation around your brand and gain connections within the community you’re seeking to help. Board members and executives: Keep your board members and executives in the loop on how your ESG initiative impacts the company’s bottom line. Independent ESG Firm: You will submit your disclosure reports to an independent firm that will evaluate your effectiveness and measure your overall impact. This is important because you can be graded and compared against other ESG initiatives that will push and challenge your own to grow.

4. Decide how to benchmark your progress

Now that you have defined what your initiative will be and who your stakeholders are, decide how you will benchmark your progress. Track your status using metrics to evaluate progress. Metrics could be anything quantifiable, including how much you’ve contributed to a cause, how many people have been helped by your initiative, or how you’ve improved internal inclusion and diversity within your organization. When benchmarking and tracking progress, think about different ways to visualize your data. Metrics matter in your reporting both for you to evaluate your progress and how your initiatives are perceived externally. Use a stakeholder engagement software like Quorum to track your engagement efforts and report on your progress. [callout align="right" heading="Use Quorum to Craft Your ESG Reports With Ease " button_text="Learn More" button_link="https://www.quorum.us/solutions/reporting/"] These public reports allow you to gauge your effectiveness against other peer corporations and encourage competition. Healthy competition can push you to try new strategies, foster deeper innovation, and spark further inspiration for initiative improvements.

5. Engage stakeholders with your reporting

With benchmark standards set, start building your reporting cadence and structure. When building your report, think about who you’re writing for. Tailor your report to your audience to make sure their bottom line is accounted for to show your impact in a relevant way. A board member will want to see how the initiative has impacted your profits. An investor will want to see how your initiatives have impacted their stock holdings. Consumers will want to see bigger statistics that will quickly summarize and prove your ESG success (like a social media campaign). With your ESG strategy set up for success, you can dive deeper into stakeholder engagement to begin scaling up your program. [post_title] => Five Steps to Build an ESG Strategy Stakeholders Will Love [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => esg-strategy-stakeholders-love [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-06-24 14:55:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-24 14:55:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.quorum.us/?post_type=resources&p=5327 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [queried_object_id] => 5327 [request] => SELECT wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND wp_posts.post_name = 'esg-strategy-stakeholders-love' AND wp_posts.post_type = 'resources' ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5327 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2021-06-24 14:53:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-24 14:53:11 [post_content] => With consumers and investors increasingly more mindful of corporate responsibility initiatives, ESG — Environmental, Social, Governance — has become a way for the public to measure how corporations bring about positive change. If your company is looking to start making a difference with its own ESG strategy, you may not know where to start. We’ve put together some helpful tips to incorporate an ESG strategy into your company.

What does ESG mean?

ESG — Environmental, Social, Governance — is a form of corporate investment centered on corporate social responsibility. These initiatives fall into one of three categories: Environment—Environmental initiatives that lighten a corporation's impact on the planet. This could be an investment in clean energy, improving the sustainability of a company’s supply chain, or offsetting business carbon emissions. Social — Seeks to strengthen a corporation's positive impact on society. This can mean building inclusion and diversity initiatives internally, investing in community improvement projects, or donating to social justice organizations. Governance — Improves the processes and hierarchical structures used to manage a corporation. Usually, governance initiatives seek to answer the question, how is a corporation positioning itself to bring about positive change? This could mean increasing internal pay transparency or diversifying executive leadership.

Why is ESG important?

ESG strategies can also be a way to boost business. With investors and consumers more conscious in buying from companies whose values align with their own, ESG is a way to expand corporate accountability beyond the boardroom. Displaying ESG progress with metrics to the public helps boost how conscious consumers perceive your corporation. ESG strategy is the avenue in which large corporations contribute to social good. This concept has become more popular as the public has put increasing pressure on corporations to use their vast resources and connections for the greater good. Corporations often promote their ESG initiatives to the public, making reporting crucial to prove ESG initiatives are working. This also includes reports delivered to the independent, impartial review boards that evaluate ESG initiative effectiveness.

How to Execute a Successful ESG Strategy

No matter what category of ESG your company decides to engage in, we’ve laid out some steps to set your ESG strategy up for success.

1. Align to company core values and beliefs

Before launching your ESG initiative, consider your corporate values and beliefs when deciding which initiatives to adopt. This ensures that the initiatives you create will harmonize with your established brand.

2. Select your initiatives

Once you’ve taken your company values into consideration, decide what you want your initiative to be. First, you’ll need to determine your budget for your initiative. You can then either poll your organization internally for project ideas or consider the communities your organization works in and the needs of that community when sketching out your project. When deciding which organizations, communities, or projects to take on, build a matrix, like the one we’ve created below, to help you evaluate project potential.

3. Consider your stakeholders from the organization or issue area you’ve selected

It’s important that your initiatives are informed by experts from the organizations you choose based on the above matrix. This gives you the best chance to improve an existing problem with your work. Your stakeholders can be those who help craft your ESG strategy or those who respond to the work you’ve done. Consider these stakeholders: Consumers: You’ll want to communicate your progress to prove your corporation is sparking positive change. These stakeholders will respond by choosing to purchase your corporation’s goods or services. Issue experts: Consult with experts on your ESG initiative subject matter to inform how you’ll execute your efforts and maximize your impact. Legislators: You’ll want to keep your elected officials informed to build a positive reputation around your brand and gain connections within the community you’re seeking to help. Board members and executives: Keep your board members and executives in the loop on how your ESG initiative impacts the company’s bottom line. Independent ESG Firm: You will submit your disclosure reports to an independent firm that will evaluate your effectiveness and measure your overall impact. This is important because you can be graded and compared against other ESG initiatives that will push and challenge your own to grow.

4. Decide how to benchmark your progress

Now that you have defined what your initiative will be and who your stakeholders are, decide how you will benchmark your progress. Track your status using metrics to evaluate progress. Metrics could be anything quantifiable, including how much you’ve contributed to a cause, how many people have been helped by your initiative, or how you’ve improved internal inclusion and diversity within your organization. When benchmarking and tracking progress, think about different ways to visualize your data. Metrics matter in your reporting both for you to evaluate your progress and how your initiatives are perceived externally. Use a stakeholder engagement software like Quorum to track your engagement efforts and report on your progress. [callout align="right" heading="Use Quorum to Craft Your ESG Reports With Ease " button_text="Learn More" button_link="https://www.quorum.us/solutions/reporting/"] These public reports allow you to gauge your effectiveness against other peer corporations and encourage competition. Healthy competition can push you to try new strategies, foster deeper innovation, and spark further inspiration for initiative improvements.

5. Engage stakeholders with your reporting

With benchmark standards set, start building your reporting cadence and structure. When building your report, think about who you’re writing for. Tailor your report to your audience to make sure their bottom line is accounted for to show your impact in a relevant way. A board member will want to see how the initiative has impacted your profits. An investor will want to see how your initiatives have impacted their stock holdings. Consumers will want to see bigger statistics that will quickly summarize and prove your ESG success (like a social media campaign). With your ESG strategy set up for success, you can dive deeper into stakeholder engagement to begin scaling up your program. [post_title] => Five Steps to Build an ESG Strategy Stakeholders Will Love [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => esg-strategy-stakeholders-love [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-06-24 14:55:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-24 14:55:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.quorum.us/?post_type=resources&p=5327 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 1 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5327 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2021-06-24 14:53:11 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-06-24 14:53:11 [post_content] => With consumers and investors increasingly more mindful of corporate responsibility initiatives, ESG — Environmental, Social, Governance — has become a way for the public to measure how corporations bring about positive change. If your company is looking to start making a difference with its own ESG strategy, you may not know where to start. We’ve put together some helpful tips to incorporate an ESG strategy into your company.

What does ESG mean?

ESG — Environmental, Social, Governance — is a form of corporate investment centered on corporate social responsibility. These initiatives fall into one of three categories: Environment—Environmental initiatives that lighten a corporation's impact on the planet. This could be an investment in clean energy, improving the sustainability of a company’s supply chain, or offsetting business carbon emissions. Social — Seeks to strengthen a corporation's positive impact on society. This can mean building inclusion and diversity initiatives internally, investing in community improvement projects, or donating to social justice organizations. Governance — Improves the processes and hierarchical structures used to manage a corporation. Usually, governance initiatives seek to answer the question, how is a corporation positioning itself to bring about positive change? This could mean increasing internal pay transparency or diversifying executive leadership.

Why is ESG important?

ESG strategies can also be a way to boost business. With investors and consumers more conscious in buying from companies whose values align with their own, ESG is a way to expand corporate accountability beyond the boardroom. Displaying ESG progress with metrics to the public helps boost how conscious consumers perceive your corporation. ESG strategy is the avenue in which large corporations contribute to social good. This concept has become more popular as the public has put increasing pressure on corporations to use their vast resources and connections for the greater good. Corporations often promote their ESG initiatives to the public, making reporting crucial to prove ESG initiatives are working. This also includes reports delivered to the independent, impartial review boards that evaluate ESG initiative effectiveness.

How to Execute a Successful ESG Strategy

No matter what category of ESG your company decides to engage in, we’ve laid out some steps to set your ESG strategy up for success.

1. Align to company core values and beliefs

Before launching your ESG initiative, consider your corporate values and beliefs when deciding which initiatives to adopt. This ensures that the initiatives you create will harmonize with your established brand.

2. Select your initiatives

Once you’ve taken your company values into consideration, decide what you want your initiative to be. First, you’ll need to determine your budget for your initiative. You can then either poll your organization internally for project ideas or consider the communities your organization works in and the needs of that community when sketching out your project. When deciding which organizations, communities, or projects to take on, build a matrix, like the one we’ve created below, to help you evaluate project potential.

3. Consider your stakeholders from the organization or issue area you’ve selected

It’s important that your initiatives are informed by experts from the organizations you choose based on the above matrix. This gives you the best chance to improve an existing problem with your work. Your stakeholders can be those who help craft your ESG strategy or those who respond to the work you’ve done. Consider these stakeholders: Consumers: You’ll want to communicate your progress to prove your corporation is sparking positive change. These stakeholders will respond by choosing to purchase your corporation’s goods or services. Issue experts: Consult with experts on your ESG initiative subject matter to inform how you’ll execute your efforts and maximize your impact. Legislators: You’ll want to keep your elected officials informed to build a positive reputation around your brand and gain connections within the community you’re seeking to help. Board members and executives: Keep your board members and executives in the loop on how your ESG initiative impacts the company’s bottom line. Independent ESG Firm: You will submit your disclosure reports to an independent firm that will evaluate your effectiveness and measure your overall impact. This is important because you can be graded and compared against other ESG initiatives that will push and challenge your own to grow.

4. Decide how to benchmark your progress

Now that you have defined what your initiative will be and who your stakeholders are, decide how you will benchmark your progress. Track your status using metrics to evaluate progress. Metrics could be anything quantifiable, including how much you’ve contributed to a cause, how many people have been helped by your initiative, or how you’ve improved internal inclusion and diversity within your organization. When benchmarking and tracking progress, think about different ways to visualize your data. Metrics matter in your reporting both for you to evaluate your progress and how your initiatives are perceived externally. Use a stakeholder engagement software like Quorum to track your engagement efforts and report on your progress. [callout align="right" heading="Use Quorum to Craft Your ESG Reports With Ease " button_text="Learn More" button_link="https://www.quorum.us/solutions/reporting/"] These public reports allow you to gauge your effectiveness against other peer corporations and encourage competition. Healthy competition can push you to try new strategies, foster deeper innovation, and spark further inspiration for initiative improvements.

5. Engage stakeholders with your reporting

With benchmark standards set, start building your reporting cadence and structure. When building your report, think about who you’re writing for. Tailor your report to your audience to make sure their bottom line is accounted for to show your impact in a relevant way. A board member will want to see how the initiative has impacted your profits. An investor will want to see how your initiatives have impacted their stock holdings. Consumers will want to see bigger statistics that will quickly summarize and prove your ESG success (like a social media campaign). With your ESG strategy set up for success, you can dive deeper into stakeholder engagement to begin scaling up your program. [post_title] => Five Steps to Build an ESG Strategy Stakeholders Will Love [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => esg-strategy-stakeholders-love [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-06-24 14:55:43 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-06-24 14:55:43 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.quorum.us/?post_type=resources&p=5327 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 1 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => 1 [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => 1 [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 8b489fc9c09ce7f30112a48f77a6257a [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
!!! 5327
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Five Steps to Build an ESG Strategy Stakeholders Will Love

Five Steps to Build an ESG Strategy Stakeholders Will Love

With consumers and investors increasingly more mindful of corporate responsibility initiatives, ESG — Environmental, Social, Governance — has become a way for the public to measure how corporations bring about positive change.

If your company is looking to start making a difference with its own ESG strategy, you may not know where to start. We’ve put together some helpful tips to incorporate an ESG strategy into your company.

What does ESG mean?

ESG — Environmental, Social, Governance — is a form of corporate investment centered on corporate social responsibility. These initiatives fall into one of three categories:

Environment—Environmental initiatives that lighten a corporation’s impact on the planet. This could be an investment in clean energy, improving the sustainability of a company’s supply chain, or offsetting business carbon emissions.

Social — Seeks to strengthen a corporation’s positive impact on society. This can mean building inclusion and diversity initiatives internally, investing in community improvement projects, or donating to social justice organizations.

Governance — Improves the processes and hierarchical structures used to manage a corporation. Usually, governance initiatives seek to answer the question, how is a corporation positioning itself to bring about positive change? This could mean increasing internal pay transparency or diversifying executive leadership.

Why is ESG important?

ESG strategies can also be a way to boost business. With investors and consumers more conscious in buying from companies whose values align with their own, ESG is a way to expand corporate accountability beyond the boardroom. Displaying ESG progress with metrics to the public helps boost how conscious consumers perceive your corporation.

ESG strategy is the avenue in which large corporations contribute to social good. This concept has become more popular as the public has put increasing pressure on corporations to use their vast resources and connections for the greater good. Corporations often promote their ESG initiatives to the public, making reporting crucial to prove ESG initiatives are working. This also includes reports delivered to the independent, impartial review boards that evaluate ESG initiative effectiveness.

How to Execute a Successful ESG Strategy

No matter what category of ESG your company decides to engage in, we’ve laid out some steps to set your ESG strategy up for success.

1. Align to company core values and beliefs

Before launching your ESG initiative, consider your corporate values and beliefs when deciding which initiatives to adopt. This ensures that the initiatives you create will harmonize with your established brand.

2. Select your initiatives

Once you’ve taken your company values into consideration, decide what you want your initiative to be. First, you’ll need to determine your budget for your initiative. You can then either poll your organization internally for project ideas or consider the communities your organization works in and the needs of that community when sketching out your project.

When deciding which organizations, communities, or projects to take on, build a matrix, like the one we’ve created below, to help you evaluate project potential.

3. Consider your stakeholders from the organization or issue area you’ve selected

It’s important that your initiatives are informed by experts from the organizations you choose based on the above matrix. This gives you the best chance to improve an existing problem with your work. Your stakeholders can be those who help craft your ESG strategy or those who respond to the work you’ve done.

Consider these stakeholders:

Consumers: You’ll want to communicate your progress to prove your corporation is sparking positive change. These stakeholders will respond by choosing to purchase your corporation’s goods or services.

Issue experts: Consult with experts on your ESG initiative subject matter to inform how you’ll execute your efforts and maximize your impact.

Legislators: You’ll want to keep your elected officials informed to build a positive reputation around your brand and gain connections within the community you’re seeking to help.

Board members and executives: Keep your board members and executives in the loop on how your ESG initiative impacts the company’s bottom line.

Independent ESG Firm: You will submit your disclosure reports to an independent firm that will evaluate your effectiveness and measure your overall impact. This is important because you can be graded and compared against other ESG initiatives that will push and challenge your own to grow.

4. Decide how to benchmark your progress

Now that you have defined what your initiative will be and who your stakeholders are, decide how you will benchmark your progress. Track your status using metrics to evaluate progress. Metrics could be anything quantifiable, including how much you’ve contributed to a cause, how many people have been helped by your initiative, or how you’ve improved internal inclusion and diversity within your organization. When benchmarking and tracking progress, think about different ways to visualize your data. Metrics matter in your reporting both for you to evaluate your progress and how your initiatives are perceived externally. Use a stakeholder engagement software like Quorum to track your engagement efforts and report on your progress.

These public reports allow you to gauge your effectiveness against other peer corporations and encourage competition. Healthy competition can push you to try new strategies, foster deeper innovation, and spark further inspiration for initiative improvements.

5. Engage stakeholders with your reporting

With benchmark standards set, start building your reporting cadence and structure. When building your report, think about who you’re writing for.

Tailor your report to your audience to make sure their bottom line is accounted for to show your impact in a relevant way. A board member will want to see how the initiative has impacted your profits. An investor will want to see how your initiatives have impacted their stock holdings. Consumers will want to see bigger statistics that will quickly summarize and prove your ESG success (like a social media campaign).

With your ESG strategy set up for success, you can dive deeper into stakeholder engagement to begin scaling up your program.

Looking to engage your stakeholders?