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WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [name] => scaling-up-esg-stakeholder-engagement [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog ) [query_vars] => Array ( [name] => scaling-up-esg-stakeholder-engagement [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [tag] => [cat] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => [order] => DESC ) [tax_query] => [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( ) [relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5389 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_content] => The key to a successful ESG program— that is, Environmental, Social, Governance — is ESG stakeholder engagement. Whether you’re looking to begin building relationships with stakeholders, report on your ESG progress, or scale up your ESG program, you need stakeholder buy-in and participation. When looking to build out your ESG stakeholder engagement efforts, use the following strategies to ensure your stakeholders fully buy-in to your cause.

Identify Your ESG Stakeholders

To start developing your stakeholder engagement strategy, you first need to identify all relevant stakeholders — internal and external. Think about who will have an interest and influence in growing your ESG program. These will fall into two buckets — internal and external stakeholders. Internal ESG stakeholders can be:

Executives: Leadership of your organization who have ultimate say in budget and resources.

Team members: Those who can help develop, grow, and give feedback to your ESG program’s performance.

Human resources: If you’re working on an ESG initiative that has to do with internal improvements to your corporate structure.

External ESG stakeholders can include:

Board members: External executives who will want to measure how your ESG program impacts your organization’s bottom line.

Investors: Those who choose to invest in organizations with exceptional corporate governance and responsibility programs.

Community Partners: These stakeholders can help inform your ESG program and execute your projects in partnership with your organization.

General Public: Conscious consumers who pay attention to how your ESG program performs and decide to purchase your organization’s goods and services.

Make a Profile for Each ESG Stakeholder

Next, build out a profile for each ESG stakeholder. You can do this in a spreadsheet or you could use a software like Quorum to streamline this process. Profiles help team members brief themselves on each individual stakeholder to fully inform their interactions and strategies for engagement. Profiles should include:
  • Name
  • Title
  • Company
  • Role within your ESG program:
    • Board Member
    • Community Partner
    • Project Manager
  • Contact information
  • Level of involvement:
    • Highly involved
    • Moderately involved
    • Mildly involved
    • Not involved
  • Biggest priority within the initiative.

Log Interactions to Build Institutional Knowledge

Once you’ve built all ESG stakeholder profiles, begin logging your interactions within each individual profile to build institutional knowledge. Immediately following a meeting with a stakeholder, take a few moments to jot down any key takeaways, feedback, or discussion points you had. Once you’re in the routine of logging interactions, you can analyze who you’re interacting with the most and the kind of interactions you’re having the most (in-person, email, social media). By tracking stakeholder interactions closely with a tool like Quorum, you can indicate whether follow-up is needed within a profile. You can also flag if certain stakeholders receive a shoutout via a company newsletter or accolade from leadership and send them a quick message to acknowledge their buy-in and influence and continue building relationships.

Map Your ESG Stakeholders

With your profiles built, map your stakeholders to organize your contacts so you can plan how you’re going to communicate and engage with them. There are many stakeholder mapping techniques, but below are some that can help you stay organized when managing an ESG program. By ESG Category  Within each stakeholder profile, tag which specific issue area or aspect of your ESG program they are most involved with. If you’re running multiple initiatives across E, S, and G categories, this will help keep you organized so you can switch between each of the three traditional categories seamlessly when interacting with stakeholders. By Stakeholder Type You communicate differently with community partners and the public than you would company executives or board members. Using this approach allows you to better tailor your messaging to your audience and communicate more relevant metrics and results according to each stakeholder type.
  • Consumers: You’ll want to communicate your progress to prove your corporation is sparking positive change. In response, consumers will choose to buy your corporation’s goods or services.
  • Community Partners: Communicate how you’ll focus your efforts and how to execute your initiative in an effective way.
  • Board members and executives: Keep your board members and executives in the loop on how your ESG initiative impacts the company’s bottom line.
With an Interest Influence Matrix Each ESG Stakeholder has a certain level of interest in an issue area of ESG as well as a level of influence on your initiative’s success within it. Knowing this, build out a stakeholder engagement matrix mapping interest versus influence for each of your ESG initiatives, with four stakeholder categories — high interest/ high influence, low interest / low influence, high interest/low influence, and low interest/high influence. Based on your matrix, you can now establish separate strategies for engaging with your ESG stakeholders. High interest and high influence stakeholders are engaged in your ESG initiative and they can help you scale up your ESG program by speaking to the value you’ve created. You’ll want to highlight discussion around ROI and value associated with your program in your interactions with them. High influence, low-interest stakeholder engagement should focus on communicating your ESG program’s impact using data that proves it is making strides to cause positive change in order to move them to the high-interest level. Think of it as a sales pitch with the result that drives interest focusing on how they’ll be part of making a lasting positive impact.

Plan Your Communications Cadence for Proactive Engagement

Create a plan for how often and what you’ll be communicating to your ESG stakeholders throughout the duration of your ESG initiative. Consider using a calendar to plan out your communications for every milestone of your ESG initiative from launch to end of year review. A calendar approach can help boost your ESG program’s reputation with ESG stakeholders proactively hearing from you throughout your entire ESG project rather than just communicating with them when you have an official ask of them. This keeps your stakeholders engaged in your ESG program’s growth every step of the way.

Create Internal Reporting System for ESG Stakeholder Engagement

By closely tracking your ESG stakeholder engagement efforts, you can better tailor your reports to each ESG stakeholder type for a more relevant reporting system. In your reports to internal stakeholders (i.e. leadership team, board members) focus your efforts on value produced for the company. Metrics to highlight include: amount of investments made after launch of ESG initiative or changes in corporate reputation since launching your ESG program. Using a software like Quorum, you can automate tracking of these metrics whether it’s an interaction on an issue, a statement made by a stakeholder, or a mention on social media. If your initiative focuses on corporate governance, include metrics that focus on the internal perception of your ESG initiative and the ways in which it has helped improve company culture. For board members and investors, you’ll want to go deeper on what this means for their bottom line. For reports shared with the public, be sure to include larger metrics that communicate impact quickly to capture attention. In both reports, you will have to prove your ESG initiatives are making a positive impact.

One System to Map, Track, Change, and Report on Stakeholder Engagement

Having a system in place for stakeholder engagement and reporting will help you communicate more effectively with your ESG stakeholders which can lead to a healthier bottom line. If you’re serious about scaling up your ESG program, consider investing in an all-in-one stakeholder engagement solution like Quorum. [post_title] => The Key to Scaling Up Your ESG Program? Proactive ESG Stakeholder Engagement [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => scaling-up-esg-stakeholder-engagement [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.quorum.us/?post_type=resources&p=5389 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [queried_object_id] => 5389 [request] => SELECT wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND wp_posts.post_name = 'scaling-up-esg-stakeholder-engagement' AND wp_posts.post_type = 'resources' ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5389 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_content] => The key to a successful ESG program— that is, Environmental, Social, Governance — is ESG stakeholder engagement. Whether you’re looking to begin building relationships with stakeholders, report on your ESG progress, or scale up your ESG program, you need stakeholder buy-in and participation. When looking to build out your ESG stakeholder engagement efforts, use the following strategies to ensure your stakeholders fully buy-in to your cause.

Identify Your ESG Stakeholders

To start developing your stakeholder engagement strategy, you first need to identify all relevant stakeholders — internal and external. Think about who will have an interest and influence in growing your ESG program. These will fall into two buckets — internal and external stakeholders. Internal ESG stakeholders can be:

Executives: Leadership of your organization who have ultimate say in budget and resources.

Team members: Those who can help develop, grow, and give feedback to your ESG program’s performance.

Human resources: If you’re working on an ESG initiative that has to do with internal improvements to your corporate structure.

External ESG stakeholders can include:

Board members: External executives who will want to measure how your ESG program impacts your organization’s bottom line.

Investors: Those who choose to invest in organizations with exceptional corporate governance and responsibility programs.

Community Partners: These stakeholders can help inform your ESG program and execute your projects in partnership with your organization.

General Public: Conscious consumers who pay attention to how your ESG program performs and decide to purchase your organization’s goods and services.

Make a Profile for Each ESG Stakeholder

Next, build out a profile for each ESG stakeholder. You can do this in a spreadsheet or you could use a software like Quorum to streamline this process. Profiles help team members brief themselves on each individual stakeholder to fully inform their interactions and strategies for engagement. Profiles should include:
  • Name
  • Title
  • Company
  • Role within your ESG program:
    • Board Member
    • Community Partner
    • Project Manager
  • Contact information
  • Level of involvement:
    • Highly involved
    • Moderately involved
    • Mildly involved
    • Not involved
  • Biggest priority within the initiative.

Log Interactions to Build Institutional Knowledge

Once you’ve built all ESG stakeholder profiles, begin logging your interactions within each individual profile to build institutional knowledge. Immediately following a meeting with a stakeholder, take a few moments to jot down any key takeaways, feedback, or discussion points you had. Once you’re in the routine of logging interactions, you can analyze who you’re interacting with the most and the kind of interactions you’re having the most (in-person, email, social media). By tracking stakeholder interactions closely with a tool like Quorum, you can indicate whether follow-up is needed within a profile. You can also flag if certain stakeholders receive a shoutout via a company newsletter or accolade from leadership and send them a quick message to acknowledge their buy-in and influence and continue building relationships.

Map Your ESG Stakeholders

With your profiles built, map your stakeholders to organize your contacts so you can plan how you’re going to communicate and engage with them. There are many stakeholder mapping techniques, but below are some that can help you stay organized when managing an ESG program. By ESG Category  Within each stakeholder profile, tag which specific issue area or aspect of your ESG program they are most involved with. If you’re running multiple initiatives across E, S, and G categories, this will help keep you organized so you can switch between each of the three traditional categories seamlessly when interacting with stakeholders. By Stakeholder Type You communicate differently with community partners and the public than you would company executives or board members. Using this approach allows you to better tailor your messaging to your audience and communicate more relevant metrics and results according to each stakeholder type.
  • Consumers: You’ll want to communicate your progress to prove your corporation is sparking positive change. In response, consumers will choose to buy your corporation’s goods or services.
  • Community Partners: Communicate how you’ll focus your efforts and how to execute your initiative in an effective way.
  • Board members and executives: Keep your board members and executives in the loop on how your ESG initiative impacts the company’s bottom line.
With an Interest Influence Matrix Each ESG Stakeholder has a certain level of interest in an issue area of ESG as well as a level of influence on your initiative’s success within it. Knowing this, build out a stakeholder engagement matrix mapping interest versus influence for each of your ESG initiatives, with four stakeholder categories — high interest/ high influence, low interest / low influence, high interest/low influence, and low interest/high influence. Based on your matrix, you can now establish separate strategies for engaging with your ESG stakeholders. High interest and high influence stakeholders are engaged in your ESG initiative and they can help you scale up your ESG program by speaking to the value you’ve created. You’ll want to highlight discussion around ROI and value associated with your program in your interactions with them. High influence, low-interest stakeholder engagement should focus on communicating your ESG program’s impact using data that proves it is making strides to cause positive change in order to move them to the high-interest level. Think of it as a sales pitch with the result that drives interest focusing on how they’ll be part of making a lasting positive impact.

Plan Your Communications Cadence for Proactive Engagement

Create a plan for how often and what you’ll be communicating to your ESG stakeholders throughout the duration of your ESG initiative. Consider using a calendar to plan out your communications for every milestone of your ESG initiative from launch to end of year review. A calendar approach can help boost your ESG program’s reputation with ESG stakeholders proactively hearing from you throughout your entire ESG project rather than just communicating with them when you have an official ask of them. This keeps your stakeholders engaged in your ESG program’s growth every step of the way.

Create Internal Reporting System for ESG Stakeholder Engagement

By closely tracking your ESG stakeholder engagement efforts, you can better tailor your reports to each ESG stakeholder type for a more relevant reporting system. In your reports to internal stakeholders (i.e. leadership team, board members) focus your efforts on value produced for the company. Metrics to highlight include: amount of investments made after launch of ESG initiative or changes in corporate reputation since launching your ESG program. Using a software like Quorum, you can automate tracking of these metrics whether it’s an interaction on an issue, a statement made by a stakeholder, or a mention on social media. If your initiative focuses on corporate governance, include metrics that focus on the internal perception of your ESG initiative and the ways in which it has helped improve company culture. For board members and investors, you’ll want to go deeper on what this means for their bottom line. For reports shared with the public, be sure to include larger metrics that communicate impact quickly to capture attention. In both reports, you will have to prove your ESG initiatives are making a positive impact.

One System to Map, Track, Change, and Report on Stakeholder Engagement

Having a system in place for stakeholder engagement and reporting will help you communicate more effectively with your ESG stakeholders which can lead to a healthier bottom line. If you’re serious about scaling up your ESG program, consider investing in an all-in-one stakeholder engagement solution like Quorum. [post_title] => The Key to Scaling Up Your ESG Program? Proactive ESG Stakeholder Engagement [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => scaling-up-esg-stakeholder-engagement [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.quorum.us/?post_type=resources&p=5389 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 1 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 5389 [post_author] => 23 [post_date] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_content] => The key to a successful ESG program— that is, Environmental, Social, Governance — is ESG stakeholder engagement. Whether you’re looking to begin building relationships with stakeholders, report on your ESG progress, or scale up your ESG program, you need stakeholder buy-in and participation. When looking to build out your ESG stakeholder engagement efforts, use the following strategies to ensure your stakeholders fully buy-in to your cause.

Identify Your ESG Stakeholders

To start developing your stakeholder engagement strategy, you first need to identify all relevant stakeholders — internal and external. Think about who will have an interest and influence in growing your ESG program. These will fall into two buckets — internal and external stakeholders. Internal ESG stakeholders can be:

Executives: Leadership of your organization who have ultimate say in budget and resources.

Team members: Those who can help develop, grow, and give feedback to your ESG program’s performance.

Human resources: If you’re working on an ESG initiative that has to do with internal improvements to your corporate structure.

External ESG stakeholders can include:

Board members: External executives who will want to measure how your ESG program impacts your organization’s bottom line.

Investors: Those who choose to invest in organizations with exceptional corporate governance and responsibility programs.

Community Partners: These stakeholders can help inform your ESG program and execute your projects in partnership with your organization.

General Public: Conscious consumers who pay attention to how your ESG program performs and decide to purchase your organization’s goods and services.

Make a Profile for Each ESG Stakeholder

Next, build out a profile for each ESG stakeholder. You can do this in a spreadsheet or you could use a software like Quorum to streamline this process. Profiles help team members brief themselves on each individual stakeholder to fully inform their interactions and strategies for engagement. Profiles should include:
  • Name
  • Title
  • Company
  • Role within your ESG program:
    • Board Member
    • Community Partner
    • Project Manager
  • Contact information
  • Level of involvement:
    • Highly involved
    • Moderately involved
    • Mildly involved
    • Not involved
  • Biggest priority within the initiative.

Log Interactions to Build Institutional Knowledge

Once you’ve built all ESG stakeholder profiles, begin logging your interactions within each individual profile to build institutional knowledge. Immediately following a meeting with a stakeholder, take a few moments to jot down any key takeaways, feedback, or discussion points you had. Once you’re in the routine of logging interactions, you can analyze who you’re interacting with the most and the kind of interactions you’re having the most (in-person, email, social media). By tracking stakeholder interactions closely with a tool like Quorum, you can indicate whether follow-up is needed within a profile. You can also flag if certain stakeholders receive a shoutout via a company newsletter or accolade from leadership and send them a quick message to acknowledge their buy-in and influence and continue building relationships.

Map Your ESG Stakeholders

With your profiles built, map your stakeholders to organize your contacts so you can plan how you’re going to communicate and engage with them. There are many stakeholder mapping techniques, but below are some that can help you stay organized when managing an ESG program. By ESG Category  Within each stakeholder profile, tag which specific issue area or aspect of your ESG program they are most involved with. If you’re running multiple initiatives across E, S, and G categories, this will help keep you organized so you can switch between each of the three traditional categories seamlessly when interacting with stakeholders. By Stakeholder Type You communicate differently with community partners and the public than you would company executives or board members. Using this approach allows you to better tailor your messaging to your audience and communicate more relevant metrics and results according to each stakeholder type.
  • Consumers: You’ll want to communicate your progress to prove your corporation is sparking positive change. In response, consumers will choose to buy your corporation’s goods or services.
  • Community Partners: Communicate how you’ll focus your efforts and how to execute your initiative in an effective way.
  • Board members and executives: Keep your board members and executives in the loop on how your ESG initiative impacts the company’s bottom line.
With an Interest Influence Matrix Each ESG Stakeholder has a certain level of interest in an issue area of ESG as well as a level of influence on your initiative’s success within it. Knowing this, build out a stakeholder engagement matrix mapping interest versus influence for each of your ESG initiatives, with four stakeholder categories — high interest/ high influence, low interest / low influence, high interest/low influence, and low interest/high influence. Based on your matrix, you can now establish separate strategies for engaging with your ESG stakeholders. High interest and high influence stakeholders are engaged in your ESG initiative and they can help you scale up your ESG program by speaking to the value you’ve created. You’ll want to highlight discussion around ROI and value associated with your program in your interactions with them. High influence, low-interest stakeholder engagement should focus on communicating your ESG program’s impact using data that proves it is making strides to cause positive change in order to move them to the high-interest level. Think of it as a sales pitch with the result that drives interest focusing on how they’ll be part of making a lasting positive impact.

Plan Your Communications Cadence for Proactive Engagement

Create a plan for how often and what you’ll be communicating to your ESG stakeholders throughout the duration of your ESG initiative. Consider using a calendar to plan out your communications for every milestone of your ESG initiative from launch to end of year review. A calendar approach can help boost your ESG program’s reputation with ESG stakeholders proactively hearing from you throughout your entire ESG project rather than just communicating with them when you have an official ask of them. This keeps your stakeholders engaged in your ESG program’s growth every step of the way.

Create Internal Reporting System for ESG Stakeholder Engagement

By closely tracking your ESG stakeholder engagement efforts, you can better tailor your reports to each ESG stakeholder type for a more relevant reporting system. In your reports to internal stakeholders (i.e. leadership team, board members) focus your efforts on value produced for the company. Metrics to highlight include: amount of investments made after launch of ESG initiative or changes in corporate reputation since launching your ESG program. Using a software like Quorum, you can automate tracking of these metrics whether it’s an interaction on an issue, a statement made by a stakeholder, or a mention on social media. If your initiative focuses on corporate governance, include metrics that focus on the internal perception of your ESG initiative and the ways in which it has helped improve company culture. For board members and investors, you’ll want to go deeper on what this means for their bottom line. For reports shared with the public, be sure to include larger metrics that communicate impact quickly to capture attention. In both reports, you will have to prove your ESG initiatives are making a positive impact.

One System to Map, Track, Change, and Report on Stakeholder Engagement

Having a system in place for stakeholder engagement and reporting will help you communicate more effectively with your ESG stakeholders which can lead to a healthier bottom line. If you’re serious about scaling up your ESG program, consider investing in an all-in-one stakeholder engagement solution like Quorum. [post_title] => The Key to Scaling Up Your ESG Program? Proactive ESG Stakeholder Engagement [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => scaling-up-esg-stakeholder-engagement [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-07-26 19:21:42 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.quorum.us/?post_type=resources&p=5389 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 1 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => 1 [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => 1 [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 701cc6ce73448c5ec3419f0cb4f3e35c [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
!!! 5389
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The Key to Scaling Up Your ESG Program? Proactive ESG Stakeholder Engagement

The Key to Scaling Up Your ESG Program? Proactive ESG Stakeholder Engagement

The key to a successful ESG program— that is, Environmental, Social, Governance — is ESG stakeholder engagement. Whether you’re looking to begin building relationships with stakeholders, report on your ESG progress, or scale up your ESG program, you need stakeholder buy-in and participation. When looking to build out your ESG stakeholder engagement efforts, use the following strategies to ensure your stakeholders fully buy-in to your cause.

Identify Your ESG Stakeholders

To start developing your stakeholder engagement strategy, you first need to identify all relevant stakeholders — internal and external.

Think about who will have an interest and influence in growing your ESG program. These will fall into two buckets — internal and external stakeholders.

Internal ESG stakeholders can be:

Executives: Leadership of your organization who have ultimate say in budget and resources.

Team members: Those who can help develop, grow, and give feedback to your ESG program’s performance.

Human resources: If you’re working on an ESG initiative that has to do with internal improvements to your corporate structure.

External ESG stakeholders can include:

Board members: External executives who will want to measure how your ESG program impacts your organization’s bottom line.

Investors: Those who choose to invest in organizations with exceptional corporate governance and responsibility programs.

Community Partners: These stakeholders can help inform your ESG program and execute your projects in partnership with your organization.

General Public: Conscious consumers who pay attention to how your ESG program performs and decide to purchase your organization’s goods and services.

Make a Profile for Each ESG Stakeholder

Next, build out a profile for each ESG stakeholder. You can do this in a spreadsheet or you could use a software like Quorum to streamline this process. Profiles help team members brief themselves on each individual stakeholder to fully inform their interactions and strategies for engagement.

Profiles should include:

  • Name
  • Title
  • Company
  • Role within your ESG program:
    • Board Member
    • Community Partner
    • Project Manager
  • Contact information
  • Level of involvement:
    • Highly involved
    • Moderately involved
    • Mildly involved
    • Not involved
  • Biggest priority within the initiative.

Log Interactions to Build Institutional Knowledge

Once you’ve built all ESG stakeholder profiles, begin logging your interactions within each individual profile to build institutional knowledge. Immediately following a meeting with a stakeholder, take a few moments to jot down any key takeaways, feedback, or discussion points you had. Once you’re in the routine of logging interactions, you can analyze who you’re interacting with the most and the kind of interactions you’re having the most (in-person, email, social media).

By tracking stakeholder interactions closely with a tool like Quorum, you can indicate whether follow-up is needed within a profile. You can also flag if certain stakeholders receive a shoutout via a company newsletter or accolade from leadership and send them a quick message to acknowledge their buy-in and influence and continue building relationships.

Map Your ESG Stakeholders

With your profiles built, map your stakeholders to organize your contacts so you can plan how you’re going to communicate and engage with them. There are many stakeholder mapping techniques, but below are some that can help you stay organized when managing an ESG program.

By ESG Category 

Within each stakeholder profile, tag which specific issue area or aspect of your ESG program they are most involved with. If you’re running multiple initiatives across E, S, and G categories, this will help keep you organized so you can switch between each of the three traditional categories seamlessly when interacting with stakeholders.

By Stakeholder Type

You communicate differently with community partners and the public than you would company executives or board members. Using this approach allows you to better tailor your messaging to your audience and communicate more relevant metrics and results according to each stakeholder type.

  • Consumers: You’ll want to communicate your progress to prove your corporation is sparking positive change. In response, consumers will choose to buy your corporation’s goods or services.
  • Community Partners: Communicate how you’ll focus your efforts and how to execute your initiative in an effective way.
  • Board members and executives: Keep your board members and executives in the loop on how your ESG initiative impacts the company’s bottom line.

With an Interest Influence Matrix

Each ESG Stakeholder has a certain level of interest in an issue area of ESG as well as a level of influence on your initiative’s success within it. Knowing this, build out a stakeholder engagement matrix mapping interest versus influence for each of your ESG initiatives, with four stakeholder categories — high interest/ high influence, low interest / low influence, high interest/low influence, and low interest/high influence.

Based on your matrix, you can now establish separate strategies for engaging with your ESG stakeholders. High interest and high influence stakeholders are engaged in your ESG initiative and they can help you scale up your ESG program by speaking to the value you’ve created. You’ll want to highlight discussion around ROI and value associated with your program in your interactions with them.

High influence, low-interest stakeholder engagement should focus on communicating your ESG program’s impact using data that proves it is making strides to cause positive change in order to move them to the high-interest level. Think of it as a sales pitch with the result that drives interest focusing on how they’ll be part of making a lasting positive impact.

Plan Your Communications Cadence for Proactive Engagement

Create a plan for how often and what you’ll be communicating to your ESG stakeholders throughout the duration of your ESG initiative. Consider using a calendar to plan out your communications for every milestone of your ESG initiative from launch to end of year review. A calendar approach can help boost your ESG program’s reputation with ESG stakeholders proactively hearing from you throughout your entire ESG project rather than just communicating with them when you have an official ask of them. This keeps your stakeholders engaged in your ESG program’s growth every step of the way.

Create Internal Reporting System for ESG Stakeholder Engagement

By closely tracking your ESG stakeholder engagement efforts, you can better tailor your reports to each ESG stakeholder type for a more relevant reporting system.

In your reports to internal stakeholders (i.e. leadership team, board members) focus your efforts on value produced for the company. Metrics to highlight include: amount of investments made after launch of ESG initiative or changes in corporate reputation since launching your ESG program. Using a software like Quorum, you can automate tracking of these metrics whether it’s an interaction on an issue, a statement made by a stakeholder, or a mention on social media. If your initiative focuses on corporate governance, include metrics that focus on the internal perception of your ESG initiative and the ways in which it has helped improve company culture.

For board members and investors, you’ll want to go deeper on what this means for their bottom line. For reports shared with the public, be sure to include larger metrics that communicate impact quickly to capture attention. In both reports, you will have to prove your ESG initiatives are making a positive impact.

One System to Map, Track, Change, and Report on Stakeholder Engagement

Having a system in place for stakeholder engagement and reporting will help you communicate more effectively with your ESG stakeholders which can lead to a healthier bottom line. If you’re serious about scaling up your ESG program, consider investing in an all-in-one stakeholder engagement solution like Quorum.

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