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WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [name] => trump-judicial-appointment-votes-senate [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => data-driven-insights ) [query_vars] => Array ( [name] => trump-judicial-appointment-votes-senate [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => data-driven-insights [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [tag] => [cat] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => [order] => DESC ) [tax_query] => [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( ) [relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1575 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2018-04-20 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-20 00:00:00 [post_content] => Justice Breyer has officially announced his retirement from the Supreme Court giving President Biden the opportunity to make good on his presidential campaign promise to nominate a black woman to the highest court in the land. His campaign promise was fulfilled on February 25, 2022, when he officially nominated D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court. This pick is no doubt informed by Biden’s previous experience in getting judicial nominees confirmed while he was chai the Senate Judiciary Committee from 1987 through 1995. During his tenure as chairman of the Judiciary Committee Biden oversaw the Supreme Court justice confirmation hearings for Justice Kennedy, Justice Thomas, Justice Ginsburg, and Justice Breyer himself. President Biden is the first former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee to nominate a Supreme Court justice, giving him key insight into how the confirmation process works and how to get the votes he needs. So far, he’s drawn from his previous experience to get the highest amount of judicial nominations confirmed by the Senate in his first year since President Reagan with 47 judges confirmed. To gain insight into how this 50-50 Senate might vote on Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination, we built a sheet of how each senator has voted for President Biden’s judicial confirmations so far in his presidency, including Brown Jackson’s nomination earlier in 2021 to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Please note this sheet does not include two confirmed judges — Judge Armando Bonilla and Judge Carolyn Lerner— because they were confirmed via voice votes. Individual voice votes are not recorded and therefore they are not included in this sheet that counts each senator’s individual voting record. 

How the Senate Voted on Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s Nomination to D.C. Circuit Court

Supreme Court nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, was confirmed by the Senate in June 2021 to be a U.S. Circuit Judge for the District of Columbia Court with 53 yeas, 44 nays, and 3 absences. Three Republican senators voted with Democrats to confirm her — Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC). Minority Leader Mitch Mcconnell (R-KY) voted against her confirmation. Every Democrat senator voted “yea” on her nomination, including swing votes Sens. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ).

Senators Manchin and Sinema Have Never Voted Against Biden’s Judicial Appointees

Moderate Democratic Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) may not always vote with their party on legislation but they have never broken rank on Biden’s judicial picks. Of the votes they’ve been present for, Manchin and Sinema have both never voted against Biden’s judicial appointees. It is important to note that both have missed some confirmation votes,  Manchin has missed seven confirmation votes, and Sinema has missed 12 votes.

Three Republican Senators Vote “Yea” on Majority of Biden’s Judicial Picks

Based on prior voting records, we might see Republican senators break rank to vote for Biden’s Supreme Court pick. Three Republicans have voted with their Democratic colleagues to confirm the majority of Biden’s judicial picks — Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) has voted “yea” 51 times, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) has voted “yea” 48 times, and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) has voted “yea” 38 times. Sens. Collins, Murkowski, and Graham also voted to confirm Attorney General Merrick Garland, who was President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee in 2016 and was controversially refused a Senate confirmation hearing. One senator has never voted "yea" on any Biden judicial appointee — Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX).

The Diversity of President Biden’s Judicial Appointees

President Biden has prioritized diversity in his judicial picks. 64% of Biden’s judicial appointees are women. Other notable firsts for judicial confirmations include the first openly LGBTQ women to sit on a federal appeals court in Vermont’s Judge Beth Robinson, and the first Muslim-American federal district judge to be confirmed in New Jersey’s Judge Zahid Quraishi.

How Each Senator Voted on Trump's Judicial Appointees

UPDATED 9/29/2020 This blog originally measured how each senator voted on Trump’s judicial appointees leading up to Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination on September 26, 2020.  With the confirmation process of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett moving at a record pace, we built a tracker of the voting records of Senators on President Trump's judicial nominees during his nearly four years in office. To access how each senator voted on Trump’s judicial appointees before September 26, 2020, click here.

Senate Votes on Amy Coney Barrett

Barrett was nominated to be United States Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit in October of 2017. She was confirmed on with 55 Yeas (52 Republicans, 3 Democrats), 43 Nays (0 Republicans, 43 Democrats), and two absences. To access how each senator voted on Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation, click here.

Original Post

On Friday, Politico reported that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is preparing the chamber for over 30 judicial appointment votes this spring. To date, President Trump has nominated 69 judges of which 32 have been approved by the Senate (29 on roll call vote, three on a voice vote). Here's a breakdown of how each of the 100 Senators cast their 29 votes on President Trump's judicial appointees:

Senator Kennedy (R-LA) is the only Republican to cast a vote against a judicial appointee this Congress.

While a handful of Republicans have missed votes, including Senator McCain's frequent absences due to health, Senator Kennedy is the only member of his caucus to cast a vote against one of President Trump's appointees. Kennedy's nay vote was in protest of Gregory Katsas, a nominee for the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

The average Senate Democrat has voted in favor of 50% of President Trump's judicial appointees.

Senators Donnelly (D-IN) and Manchin (D-WV) lead their caucus in votes cast in favor of the president's judicial appointments. In the 2016 election, Trump carried each of their states with an average of 63 percent of the vote. The average Senate Democrat has voted in favor of 15 of 29 judicial appointees. Senator Booker (D-NJ) has voted in favor of seven judicial appointees—the fewest of the chamber. To download the full dataset, check out our interactive spreadsheet of Senate Judicial Appointment Votes [post_title] => How Each Senator Has Voted On Biden's Judicial Appointees (So Far) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => trump-judicial-appointment-votes-senate [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-03-08 21:33:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-03-08 21:33:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://marketing-staging.quorum.us/resources/trump-judicial-appointment-votes-senate/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [queried_object_id] => 1575 [request] => SELECT wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND wp_posts.post_name = 'trump-judicial-appointment-votes-senate' AND wp_posts.post_type = 'resources' ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1575 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2018-04-20 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-20 00:00:00 [post_content] => Justice Breyer has officially announced his retirement from the Supreme Court giving President Biden the opportunity to make good on his presidential campaign promise to nominate a black woman to the highest court in the land. His campaign promise was fulfilled on February 25, 2022, when he officially nominated D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court. This pick is no doubt informed by Biden’s previous experience in getting judicial nominees confirmed while he was chai the Senate Judiciary Committee from 1987 through 1995. During his tenure as chairman of the Judiciary Committee Biden oversaw the Supreme Court justice confirmation hearings for Justice Kennedy, Justice Thomas, Justice Ginsburg, and Justice Breyer himself. President Biden is the first former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee to nominate a Supreme Court justice, giving him key insight into how the confirmation process works and how to get the votes he needs. So far, he’s drawn from his previous experience to get the highest amount of judicial nominations confirmed by the Senate in his first year since President Reagan with 47 judges confirmed. To gain insight into how this 50-50 Senate might vote on Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination, we built a sheet of how each senator has voted for President Biden’s judicial confirmations so far in his presidency, including Brown Jackson’s nomination earlier in 2021 to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Please note this sheet does not include two confirmed judges — Judge Armando Bonilla and Judge Carolyn Lerner— because they were confirmed via voice votes. Individual voice votes are not recorded and therefore they are not included in this sheet that counts each senator’s individual voting record. 

How the Senate Voted on Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s Nomination to D.C. Circuit Court

Supreme Court nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, was confirmed by the Senate in June 2021 to be a U.S. Circuit Judge for the District of Columbia Court with 53 yeas, 44 nays, and 3 absences. Three Republican senators voted with Democrats to confirm her — Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC). Minority Leader Mitch Mcconnell (R-KY) voted against her confirmation. Every Democrat senator voted “yea” on her nomination, including swing votes Sens. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ).

Senators Manchin and Sinema Have Never Voted Against Biden’s Judicial Appointees

Moderate Democratic Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) may not always vote with their party on legislation but they have never broken rank on Biden’s judicial picks. Of the votes they’ve been present for, Manchin and Sinema have both never voted against Biden’s judicial appointees. It is important to note that both have missed some confirmation votes,  Manchin has missed seven confirmation votes, and Sinema has missed 12 votes.

Three Republican Senators Vote “Yea” on Majority of Biden’s Judicial Picks

Based on prior voting records, we might see Republican senators break rank to vote for Biden’s Supreme Court pick. Three Republicans have voted with their Democratic colleagues to confirm the majority of Biden’s judicial picks — Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) has voted “yea” 51 times, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) has voted “yea” 48 times, and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) has voted “yea” 38 times. Sens. Collins, Murkowski, and Graham also voted to confirm Attorney General Merrick Garland, who was President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee in 2016 and was controversially refused a Senate confirmation hearing. One senator has never voted "yea" on any Biden judicial appointee — Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX).

The Diversity of President Biden’s Judicial Appointees

President Biden has prioritized diversity in his judicial picks. 64% of Biden’s judicial appointees are women. Other notable firsts for judicial confirmations include the first openly LGBTQ women to sit on a federal appeals court in Vermont’s Judge Beth Robinson, and the first Muslim-American federal district judge to be confirmed in New Jersey’s Judge Zahid Quraishi.

How Each Senator Voted on Trump's Judicial Appointees

UPDATED 9/29/2020 This blog originally measured how each senator voted on Trump’s judicial appointees leading up to Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination on September 26, 2020.  With the confirmation process of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett moving at a record pace, we built a tracker of the voting records of Senators on President Trump's judicial nominees during his nearly four years in office. To access how each senator voted on Trump’s judicial appointees before September 26, 2020, click here.

Senate Votes on Amy Coney Barrett

Barrett was nominated to be United States Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit in October of 2017. She was confirmed on with 55 Yeas (52 Republicans, 3 Democrats), 43 Nays (0 Republicans, 43 Democrats), and two absences. To access how each senator voted on Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation, click here.

Original Post

On Friday, Politico reported that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is preparing the chamber for over 30 judicial appointment votes this spring. To date, President Trump has nominated 69 judges of which 32 have been approved by the Senate (29 on roll call vote, three on a voice vote). Here's a breakdown of how each of the 100 Senators cast their 29 votes on President Trump's judicial appointees:

Senator Kennedy (R-LA) is the only Republican to cast a vote against a judicial appointee this Congress.

While a handful of Republicans have missed votes, including Senator McCain's frequent absences due to health, Senator Kennedy is the only member of his caucus to cast a vote against one of President Trump's appointees. Kennedy's nay vote was in protest of Gregory Katsas, a nominee for the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

The average Senate Democrat has voted in favor of 50% of President Trump's judicial appointees.

Senators Donnelly (D-IN) and Manchin (D-WV) lead their caucus in votes cast in favor of the president's judicial appointments. In the 2016 election, Trump carried each of their states with an average of 63 percent of the vote. The average Senate Democrat has voted in favor of 15 of 29 judicial appointees. Senator Booker (D-NJ) has voted in favor of seven judicial appointees—the fewest of the chamber. To download the full dataset, check out our interactive spreadsheet of Senate Judicial Appointment Votes [post_title] => How Each Senator Has Voted On Biden's Judicial Appointees (So Far) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => trump-judicial-appointment-votes-senate [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-03-08 21:33:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-03-08 21:33:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://marketing-staging.quorum.us/resources/trump-judicial-appointment-votes-senate/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 1 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1575 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2018-04-20 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-20 00:00:00 [post_content] => Justice Breyer has officially announced his retirement from the Supreme Court giving President Biden the opportunity to make good on his presidential campaign promise to nominate a black woman to the highest court in the land. His campaign promise was fulfilled on February 25, 2022, when he officially nominated D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court. This pick is no doubt informed by Biden’s previous experience in getting judicial nominees confirmed while he was chai the Senate Judiciary Committee from 1987 through 1995. During his tenure as chairman of the Judiciary Committee Biden oversaw the Supreme Court justice confirmation hearings for Justice Kennedy, Justice Thomas, Justice Ginsburg, and Justice Breyer himself. President Biden is the first former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee to nominate a Supreme Court justice, giving him key insight into how the confirmation process works and how to get the votes he needs. So far, he’s drawn from his previous experience to get the highest amount of judicial nominations confirmed by the Senate in his first year since President Reagan with 47 judges confirmed. To gain insight into how this 50-50 Senate might vote on Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination, we built a sheet of how each senator has voted for President Biden’s judicial confirmations so far in his presidency, including Brown Jackson’s nomination earlier in 2021 to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals. Please note this sheet does not include two confirmed judges — Judge Armando Bonilla and Judge Carolyn Lerner— because they were confirmed via voice votes. Individual voice votes are not recorded and therefore they are not included in this sheet that counts each senator’s individual voting record. 

How the Senate Voted on Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s Nomination to D.C. Circuit Court

Supreme Court nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, was confirmed by the Senate in June 2021 to be a U.S. Circuit Judge for the District of Columbia Court with 53 yeas, 44 nays, and 3 absences. Three Republican senators voted with Democrats to confirm her — Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC). Minority Leader Mitch Mcconnell (R-KY) voted against her confirmation. Every Democrat senator voted “yea” on her nomination, including swing votes Sens. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ).

Senators Manchin and Sinema Have Never Voted Against Biden’s Judicial Appointees

Moderate Democratic Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) may not always vote with their party on legislation but they have never broken rank on Biden’s judicial picks. Of the votes they’ve been present for, Manchin and Sinema have both never voted against Biden’s judicial appointees. It is important to note that both have missed some confirmation votes,  Manchin has missed seven confirmation votes, and Sinema has missed 12 votes.

Three Republican Senators Vote “Yea” on Majority of Biden’s Judicial Picks

Based on prior voting records, we might see Republican senators break rank to vote for Biden’s Supreme Court pick. Three Republicans have voted with their Democratic colleagues to confirm the majority of Biden’s judicial picks — Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) has voted “yea” 51 times, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) has voted “yea” 48 times, and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) has voted “yea” 38 times. Sens. Collins, Murkowski, and Graham also voted to confirm Attorney General Merrick Garland, who was President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee in 2016 and was controversially refused a Senate confirmation hearing. One senator has never voted "yea" on any Biden judicial appointee — Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX).

The Diversity of President Biden’s Judicial Appointees

President Biden has prioritized diversity in his judicial picks. 64% of Biden’s judicial appointees are women. Other notable firsts for judicial confirmations include the first openly LGBTQ women to sit on a federal appeals court in Vermont’s Judge Beth Robinson, and the first Muslim-American federal district judge to be confirmed in New Jersey’s Judge Zahid Quraishi.

How Each Senator Voted on Trump's Judicial Appointees

UPDATED 9/29/2020 This blog originally measured how each senator voted on Trump’s judicial appointees leading up to Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination on September 26, 2020.  With the confirmation process of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett moving at a record pace, we built a tracker of the voting records of Senators on President Trump's judicial nominees during his nearly four years in office. To access how each senator voted on Trump’s judicial appointees before September 26, 2020, click here.

Senate Votes on Amy Coney Barrett

Barrett was nominated to be United States Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit in October of 2017. She was confirmed on with 55 Yeas (52 Republicans, 3 Democrats), 43 Nays (0 Republicans, 43 Democrats), and two absences. To access how each senator voted on Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation, click here.

Original Post

On Friday, Politico reported that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is preparing the chamber for over 30 judicial appointment votes this spring. To date, President Trump has nominated 69 judges of which 32 have been approved by the Senate (29 on roll call vote, three on a voice vote). Here's a breakdown of how each of the 100 Senators cast their 29 votes on President Trump's judicial appointees:

Senator Kennedy (R-LA) is the only Republican to cast a vote against a judicial appointee this Congress.

While a handful of Republicans have missed votes, including Senator McCain's frequent absences due to health, Senator Kennedy is the only member of his caucus to cast a vote against one of President Trump's appointees. Kennedy's nay vote was in protest of Gregory Katsas, a nominee for the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

The average Senate Democrat has voted in favor of 50% of President Trump's judicial appointees.

Senators Donnelly (D-IN) and Manchin (D-WV) lead their caucus in votes cast in favor of the president's judicial appointments. In the 2016 election, Trump carried each of their states with an average of 63 percent of the vote. The average Senate Democrat has voted in favor of 15 of 29 judicial appointees. Senator Booker (D-NJ) has voted in favor of seven judicial appointees—the fewest of the chamber. To download the full dataset, check out our interactive spreadsheet of Senate Judicial Appointment Votes [post_title] => How Each Senator Has Voted On Biden's Judicial Appointees (So Far) [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => trump-judicial-appointment-votes-senate [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2022-03-08 21:33:14 [post_modified_gmt] => 2022-03-08 21:33:14 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://marketing-staging.quorum.us/resources/trump-judicial-appointment-votes-senate/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 1 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => 1 [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => 1 [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 3a9e647ee702cc3a0b15b65df1481511 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
!!! 1575
Data Driven Insights

How Each Senator Has Voted On Biden’s Judicial Appointees (So Far)

How Each Senator Has Voted On Biden’s Judicial Appointees (So Far)

Justice Breyer has officially announced his retirement from the Supreme Court giving President Biden the opportunity to make good on his presidential campaign promise to nominate a black woman to the highest court in the land. His campaign promise was fulfilled on February 25, 2022, when he officially nominated D.C. Circuit Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court.

This pick is no doubt informed by Biden’s previous experience in getting judicial nominees confirmed while he was chai the Senate Judiciary Committee from 1987 through 1995. During his tenure as chairman of the Judiciary Committee Biden oversaw the Supreme Court justice confirmation hearings for Justice Kennedy, Justice Thomas, Justice Ginsburg, and Justice Breyer himself.

President Biden is the first former chair of the Senate Judiciary Committee to nominate a Supreme Court justice, giving him key insight into how the confirmation process works and how to get the votes he needs. So far, he’s drawn from his previous experience to get the highest amount of judicial nominations confirmed by the Senate in his first year since President Reagan with 47 judges confirmed.

To gain insight into how this 50-50 Senate might vote on Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s nomination, we built a sheet of how each senator has voted for President Biden’s judicial confirmations so far in his presidency, including Brown Jackson’s nomination earlier in 2021 to the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Please note this sheet does not include two confirmed judges — Judge Armando Bonilla and Judge Carolyn Lerner— because they were confirmed via voice votes. Individual voice votes are not recorded and therefore they are not included in this sheet that counts each senator’s individual voting record. 

How the Senate Voted on Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson’s Nomination to D.C. Circuit Court

Supreme Court nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, was confirmed by the Senate in June 2021 to be a U.S. Circuit Judge for the District of Columbia Court with 53 yeas, 44 nays, and 3 absences. Three Republican senators voted with Democrats to confirm her — Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME), Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC). Minority Leader Mitch Mcconnell (R-KY) voted against her confirmation. Every Democrat senator voted “yea” on her nomination, including swing votes Sens. Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ).

Senators Manchin and Sinema Have Never Voted Against Biden’s Judicial Appointees

Moderate Democratic Senators Joe Manchin (D-WV) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) may not always vote with their party on legislation but they have never broken rank on Biden’s judicial picks. Of the votes they’ve been present for, Manchin and Sinema have both never voted against Biden’s judicial appointees. It is important to note that both have missed some confirmation votes,  Manchin has missed seven confirmation votes, and Sinema has missed 12 votes.

Three Republican Senators Vote “Yea” on Majority of Biden’s Judicial Picks

Based on prior voting records, we might see Republican senators break rank to vote for Biden’s Supreme Court pick. Three Republicans have voted with their Democratic colleagues to confirm the majority of Biden’s judicial picks — Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) has voted “yea” 51 times, Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) has voted “yea” 48 times, and Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) has voted “yea” 38 times. Sens. Collins, Murkowski, and Graham also voted to confirm Attorney General Merrick Garland, who was President Obama’s Supreme Court nominee in 2016 and was controversially refused a Senate confirmation hearing.

One senator has never voted “yea” on any Biden judicial appointee — Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX).

The Diversity of President Biden’s Judicial Appointees

President Biden has prioritized diversity in his judicial picks. 64% of Biden’s judicial appointees are women. Other notable firsts for judicial confirmations include the first openly LGBTQ women to sit on a federal appeals court in Vermont’s Judge Beth Robinson, and the first Muslim-American federal district judge to be confirmed in New Jersey’s Judge Zahid Quraishi.

How Each Senator Voted on Trump’s Judicial Appointees

UPDATED 9/29/2020

This blog originally measured how each senator voted on Trump’s judicial appointees leading up to Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination on September 26, 2020. 

With the confirmation process of Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett moving at a record pace, we built a tracker of the voting records of Senators on President Trump’s judicial nominees during his nearly four years in office.

To access how each senator voted on Trump’s judicial appointees before September 26, 2020, click here.

Senate Votes on Amy Coney Barrett

Barrett was nominated to be United States Circuit Judge for the Seventh Circuit in October of 2017. She was confirmed on with 55 Yeas (52 Republicans, 3 Democrats), 43 Nays (0 Republicans, 43 Democrats), and two absences.

To access how each senator voted on Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation, click here.

Original Post

On Friday, Politico reported that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) is preparing the chamber for over 30 judicial appointment votes this spring. To date, President Trump has nominated 69 judges of which 32 have been approved by the Senate (29 on roll call vote, three on a voice vote). Here’s a breakdown of how each of the 100 Senators cast their 29 votes on President Trump’s judicial appointees:

Senator Kennedy (R-LA) is the only Republican to cast a vote against a judicial appointee this Congress.

While a handful of Republicans have missed votes, including Senator McCain’s frequent absences due to health, Senator Kennedy is the only member of his caucus to cast a vote against one of President Trump’s appointees. Kennedy’s nay vote was in protest of Gregory Katsas, a nominee for the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

The average Senate Democrat has voted in favor of 50% of President Trump’s judicial appointees.

Senators Donnelly (D-IN) and Manchin (D-WV) lead their caucus in votes cast in favor of the president’s judicial appointments. In the 2016 election, Trump carried each of their states with an average of 63 percent of the vote. The average Senate Democrat has voted in favor of 15 of 29 judicial appointees. Senator Booker (D-NJ) has voted in favor of seven judicial appointees—the fewest of the chamber.

To download the full dataset, check out our interactive spreadsheet of Senate Judicial Appointment Votes