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WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [name] => ten-best-practices-state-government-affairs [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog ) [query_vars] => Array ( [name] => ten-best-practices-state-government-affairs [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [tag] => [cat] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => [order] => DESC ) [tax_query] => [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( ) [relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1576 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2018-04-19 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-19 00:00:00 [post_content] => With Congress facing gridlock at nearly every turn, many organizations are placing new priorities and attention on their state legislative strategy. Here are three best practices for forming your state legislative action plan.

Track Social Media for Problems and Opportunities to Engage

50 percent of state legislators are on Twitter and 75 percent are on Facebook. More and more, the conversation is happening not just in person but online, meaning you need to know whenever your issue pops up in the conversation on social media. This is especially important to act as an early warning sign when legislation has not been formally introduced, but your issue is the topic of conversation on the web.

Be on the Ground in a State

This may involve hiring a contract lobbyist from specific states, or placing your team in priority state capitals. If something comes up suddenly that impacts an issue you care about, you can be ready to go and respond in a timely manner. Additionally, when you are on the ground, it’s easier to build relationships with stakeholders who can keep you informed as progress happens on your issues.

Use National Networks to Build Relationships

One way to build the social network that can keep you informed on issues in states is to meet individuals also doing state lobbying or working in state legislatures. This includes networks like the National Governors Association, the National Speakers Conference, or the State Legislative Leaders Foundation.

Organize Teams by Region

Region-based teams save time and money. If you have region-based teams, you can get someone to any state within a few hours, whereas if you were only on one coast or in one region, your options to get to some regions of the US would be much more limited. This also limits the need to hire as many contract lobbyists, because your in-house team can get around much more efficiently and build their own networks in their particular region.

Consult Policy Experts

A best practice to stay on top of the specifics of legislation is to have a point person tracking legislation and measuring the implications. This person can then communicate that information to the government affairs team on the ground. If your team is large enough, this can involve issue area specialists who can easily comprehend legislation in a certain category and then communicate with the business team to understand the impact it would have on an organization’s bottom line.

Build Key Relationships

With thousands of state legislators across the country, it’s impossible to get to know all of them and build relationships with each one. Look to engage the legislators who chair or sit on relevant committees to your organization, legislators who are the most vocal on the issues that matter to you, or legislators who are most effective at causing change.

Seem Bigger Than You Are

Your team may be small, but with the proper tools, you can reach each of the 7,400 state legislators. With tools like Quorum’s Outbox you can send emails to each state legislator that appears as a personalized message in their inbox. Use advertising on social media to show that you are vocal in their state. Attend local events or sponsor a dinner to keep your organization in the front of their minds.

Attend Fundraisers

Use corporate and political action committee funding when appropriate to donate to legislators. It’s important to be aware of the rules in each respective state, as they differ in what is allowed.

Go Federal, Go Local

Government is a constantly changing space, with elected officials transitioning to new offices regularly. The mayor may become the governor, or the state legislator may become the next Senator. When the opportunity arises, get to know officials at different levels of government who may have previously had a hand in state affairs or could be involved in the future.

Survey Your Network

It is very likely that stakeholders or advocates in your network have relationships with legislators in different states. By surveying them for their existing relationships, you can build ambassadors of your organization who can help fill in the gaps in areas where you aren’t on the ground.   [post_title] => Ten Best Practices in State Government Affairs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ten-best-practices-state-government-affairs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-16 01:51:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-16 01:51:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://marketing-staging.quorum.us/resources/three-best-practices-state-government-affairs/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [queried_object_id] => 1576 [request] => SELECT wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND wp_posts.post_name = 'ten-best-practices-state-government-affairs' AND wp_posts.post_type = 'resources' ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1576 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2018-04-19 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-19 00:00:00 [post_content] => With Congress facing gridlock at nearly every turn, many organizations are placing new priorities and attention on their state legislative strategy. Here are three best practices for forming your state legislative action plan.

Track Social Media for Problems and Opportunities to Engage

50 percent of state legislators are on Twitter and 75 percent are on Facebook. More and more, the conversation is happening not just in person but online, meaning you need to know whenever your issue pops up in the conversation on social media. This is especially important to act as an early warning sign when legislation has not been formally introduced, but your issue is the topic of conversation on the web.

Be on the Ground in a State

This may involve hiring a contract lobbyist from specific states, or placing your team in priority state capitals. If something comes up suddenly that impacts an issue you care about, you can be ready to go and respond in a timely manner. Additionally, when you are on the ground, it’s easier to build relationships with stakeholders who can keep you informed as progress happens on your issues.

Use National Networks to Build Relationships

One way to build the social network that can keep you informed on issues in states is to meet individuals also doing state lobbying or working in state legislatures. This includes networks like the National Governors Association, the National Speakers Conference, or the State Legislative Leaders Foundation.

Organize Teams by Region

Region-based teams save time and money. If you have region-based teams, you can get someone to any state within a few hours, whereas if you were only on one coast or in one region, your options to get to some regions of the US would be much more limited. This also limits the need to hire as many contract lobbyists, because your in-house team can get around much more efficiently and build their own networks in their particular region.

Consult Policy Experts

A best practice to stay on top of the specifics of legislation is to have a point person tracking legislation and measuring the implications. This person can then communicate that information to the government affairs team on the ground. If your team is large enough, this can involve issue area specialists who can easily comprehend legislation in a certain category and then communicate with the business team to understand the impact it would have on an organization’s bottom line.

Build Key Relationships

With thousands of state legislators across the country, it’s impossible to get to know all of them and build relationships with each one. Look to engage the legislators who chair or sit on relevant committees to your organization, legislators who are the most vocal on the issues that matter to you, or legislators who are most effective at causing change.

Seem Bigger Than You Are

Your team may be small, but with the proper tools, you can reach each of the 7,400 state legislators. With tools like Quorum’s Outbox you can send emails to each state legislator that appears as a personalized message in their inbox. Use advertising on social media to show that you are vocal in their state. Attend local events or sponsor a dinner to keep your organization in the front of their minds.

Attend Fundraisers

Use corporate and political action committee funding when appropriate to donate to legislators. It’s important to be aware of the rules in each respective state, as they differ in what is allowed.

Go Federal, Go Local

Government is a constantly changing space, with elected officials transitioning to new offices regularly. The mayor may become the governor, or the state legislator may become the next Senator. When the opportunity arises, get to know officials at different levels of government who may have previously had a hand in state affairs or could be involved in the future.

Survey Your Network

It is very likely that stakeholders or advocates in your network have relationships with legislators in different states. By surveying them for their existing relationships, you can build ambassadors of your organization who can help fill in the gaps in areas where you aren’t on the ground.   [post_title] => Ten Best Practices in State Government Affairs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ten-best-practices-state-government-affairs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-16 01:51:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-16 01:51:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://marketing-staging.quorum.us/resources/three-best-practices-state-government-affairs/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 1 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1576 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2018-04-19 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2018-04-19 00:00:00 [post_content] => With Congress facing gridlock at nearly every turn, many organizations are placing new priorities and attention on their state legislative strategy. Here are three best practices for forming your state legislative action plan.

Track Social Media for Problems and Opportunities to Engage

50 percent of state legislators are on Twitter and 75 percent are on Facebook. More and more, the conversation is happening not just in person but online, meaning you need to know whenever your issue pops up in the conversation on social media. This is especially important to act as an early warning sign when legislation has not been formally introduced, but your issue is the topic of conversation on the web.

Be on the Ground in a State

This may involve hiring a contract lobbyist from specific states, or placing your team in priority state capitals. If something comes up suddenly that impacts an issue you care about, you can be ready to go and respond in a timely manner. Additionally, when you are on the ground, it’s easier to build relationships with stakeholders who can keep you informed as progress happens on your issues.

Use National Networks to Build Relationships

One way to build the social network that can keep you informed on issues in states is to meet individuals also doing state lobbying or working in state legislatures. This includes networks like the National Governors Association, the National Speakers Conference, or the State Legislative Leaders Foundation.

Organize Teams by Region

Region-based teams save time and money. If you have region-based teams, you can get someone to any state within a few hours, whereas if you were only on one coast or in one region, your options to get to some regions of the US would be much more limited. This also limits the need to hire as many contract lobbyists, because your in-house team can get around much more efficiently and build their own networks in their particular region.

Consult Policy Experts

A best practice to stay on top of the specifics of legislation is to have a point person tracking legislation and measuring the implications. This person can then communicate that information to the government affairs team on the ground. If your team is large enough, this can involve issue area specialists who can easily comprehend legislation in a certain category and then communicate with the business team to understand the impact it would have on an organization’s bottom line.

Build Key Relationships

With thousands of state legislators across the country, it’s impossible to get to know all of them and build relationships with each one. Look to engage the legislators who chair or sit on relevant committees to your organization, legislators who are the most vocal on the issues that matter to you, or legislators who are most effective at causing change.

Seem Bigger Than You Are

Your team may be small, but with the proper tools, you can reach each of the 7,400 state legislators. With tools like Quorum’s Outbox you can send emails to each state legislator that appears as a personalized message in their inbox. Use advertising on social media to show that you are vocal in their state. Attend local events or sponsor a dinner to keep your organization in the front of their minds.

Attend Fundraisers

Use corporate and political action committee funding when appropriate to donate to legislators. It’s important to be aware of the rules in each respective state, as they differ in what is allowed.

Go Federal, Go Local

Government is a constantly changing space, with elected officials transitioning to new offices regularly. The mayor may become the governor, or the state legislator may become the next Senator. When the opportunity arises, get to know officials at different levels of government who may have previously had a hand in state affairs or could be involved in the future.

Survey Your Network

It is very likely that stakeholders or advocates in your network have relationships with legislators in different states. By surveying them for their existing relationships, you can build ambassadors of your organization who can help fill in the gaps in areas where you aren’t on the ground.   [post_title] => Ten Best Practices in State Government Affairs [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => ten-best-practices-state-government-affairs [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-16 01:51:54 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-16 01:51:54 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://marketing-staging.quorum.us/resources/three-best-practices-state-government-affairs/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 1 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => 1 [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => 1 [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 7dc01aa1db005fdb4f48ffae9dc7760f [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
!!! 1576
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Ten Best Practices in State Government Affairs

Ten Best Practices in State Government Affairs

With Congress facing gridlock at nearly every turn, many organizations are placing new priorities and attention on their state legislative strategy. Here are three best practices for forming your state legislative action plan.

Track Social Media for Problems and Opportunities to Engage

50 percent of state legislators are on Twitter and 75 percent are on Facebook. More and more, the conversation is happening not just in person but online, meaning you need to know whenever your issue pops up in the conversation on social media. This is especially important to act as an early warning sign when legislation has not been formally introduced, but your issue is the topic of conversation on the web.

Be on the Ground in a State

This may involve hiring a contract lobbyist from specific states, or placing your team in priority state capitals. If something comes up suddenly that impacts an issue you care about, you can be ready to go and respond in a timely manner. Additionally, when you are on the ground, it’s easier to build relationships with stakeholders who can keep you informed as progress happens on your issues.

Use National Networks to Build Relationships

One way to build the social network that can keep you informed on issues in states is to meet individuals also doing state lobbying or working in state legislatures. This includes networks like the National Governors Association, the National Speakers Conference, or the State Legislative Leaders Foundation.

Organize Teams by Region

Region-based teams save time and money. If you have region-based teams, you can get someone to any state within a few hours, whereas if you were only on one coast or in one region, your options to get to some regions of the US would be much more limited. This also limits the need to hire as many contract lobbyists, because your in-house team can get around much more efficiently and build their own networks in their particular region.

Consult Policy Experts

A best practice to stay on top of the specifics of legislation is to have a point person tracking legislation and measuring the implications. This person can then communicate that information to the government affairs team on the ground. If your team is large enough, this can involve issue area specialists who can easily comprehend legislation in a certain category and then communicate with the business team to understand the impact it would have on an organization’s bottom line.

Build Key Relationships

With thousands of state legislators across the country, it’s impossible to get to know all of them and build relationships with each one. Look to engage the legislators who chair or sit on relevant committees to your organization, legislators who are the most vocal on the issues that matter to you, or legislators who are most effective at causing change.

Seem Bigger Than You Are

Your team may be small, but with the proper tools, you can reach each of the 7,400 state legislators. With tools like Quorum’s Outbox you can send emails to each state legislator that appears as a personalized message in their inbox. Use advertising on social media to show that you are vocal in their state. Attend local events or sponsor a dinner to keep your organization in the front of their minds.

Attend Fundraisers

Use corporate and political action committee funding when appropriate to donate to legislators. It’s important to be aware of the rules in each respective state, as they differ in what is allowed.

Go Federal, Go Local

Government is a constantly changing space, with elected officials transitioning to new offices regularly. The mayor may become the governor, or the state legislator may become the next Senator. When the opportunity arises, get to know officials at different levels of government who may have previously had a hand in state affairs or could be involved in the future.

Survey Your Network

It is very likely that stakeholders or advocates in your network have relationships with legislators in different states. By surveying them for their existing relationships, you can build ambassadors of your organization who can help fill in the gaps in areas where you aren’t on the ground.