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WP_Query Object ( [query] => Array ( [name] => finding-legislative-champions [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog ) [query_vars] => Array ( [name] => finding-legislative-champions [post_type] => resources [resource-type] => blog [error] => [m] => [p] => 0 [post_parent] => [subpost] => [subpost_id] => [attachment] => [attachment_id] => 0 [pagename] => [page_id] => 0 [second] => [minute] => [hour] => [day] => 0 [monthnum] => 0 [year] => 0 [w] => 0 [category_name] => [tag] => [cat] => [tag_id] => [author] => [author_name] => [feed] => [tb] => [paged] => 0 [meta_key] => [meta_value] => [preview] => [s] => [sentence] => [title] => [fields] => [menu_order] => [embed] => [category__in] => Array ( ) [category__not_in] => Array ( ) [category__and] => Array ( ) [post__in] => Array ( ) [post__not_in] => Array ( ) [post_name__in] => Array ( ) [tag__in] => Array ( ) [tag__not_in] => Array ( ) [tag__and] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__in] => Array ( ) [tag_slug__and] => Array ( ) [post_parent__in] => Array ( ) [post_parent__not_in] => Array ( ) [author__in] => Array ( ) [author__not_in] => Array ( ) [ignore_sticky_posts] => [suppress_filters] => [cache_results] => 1 [update_post_term_cache] => 1 [lazy_load_term_meta] => 1 [update_post_meta_cache] => 1 [posts_per_page] => 10 [nopaging] => [comments_per_page] => 50 [no_found_rows] => [order] => DESC ) [tax_query] => [meta_query] => WP_Meta_Query Object ( [queries] => Array ( ) [relation] => [meta_table] => [meta_id_column] => [primary_table] => [primary_id_column] => [table_aliases:protected] => Array ( ) [clauses:protected] => Array ( ) [has_or_relation:protected] => ) [date_query] => [queried_object] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1695 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-10-06 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-06 00:00:00 [post_content] => Pushing legislative priorities on the Hill? Chances are you already have a list of go-to members who consistently support your policy positions. But how can you be sure you are targeting the most relevant members and aren’t missing any engagement opportunities? The key to building and sustaining support for your legislative priorities and successfully influencing the legislative process means knowing not only who your champions are, but which members should be champions and which members could be champions. Here are eight steps to identify and target legislative champions using quantitative data.

Step One: Create a Spreadsheet

You’ll want to create a spreadsheet with the names of all 100 Senators and 435 Representatives in the U.S. Congress in column “A”. Pro Tip: Start your list in column “A”, row 2 so there is room for labels across the top of your spreadsheet.

Step Two: Identify Key Committees

List out the name of each committee you’ve identified as being important along the top of your spreadsheet. Use Congress.gov to find committees. Still using Congress.gov, find the members of each key committee you’ve identified by clicking the links to each committee website. Mark the cells with a “1” in the column and the row corresponding to the committee and member.

Step Three: Explore the Data

Take your targeting farther with public statistics and your own organizational data to inform your legislative strategy.

The U.S. Census Bureau

Use the American Community Survey to find statistics on educational attainment, unemployment, health insurance rates, racial and socioeconomic breakdowns, and information about occupation for every congressional district in the United States. When aggregated, this data can show which members have constituents affected by an issue, which can be used to persuade legislators.

Organizational Data

Don’t forget to use your organization's own membership, stakeholder, or corporate databases to map your presence within congressional districts and identify which members represent the districts your supporters call home (and where you can rally supporters to engage on your behalf).

Step Four: Find Who's Active

Take a look at which elected officials have historically voted or cosponsored in favor of your positions, who introduces the most bills on the issue, who is most effective at getting bills out of committee, and who is already talking about the issue. Mark these members with “1s” in the corresponding columns and rows.

Step Five: Monitor Social Media

Elected officials take to social media to talk about things they care about-- sometimes things they haven’t actively supported legislatively. Track what they are saying using these tools. If they’re talking positively about your issue, add a “1” to that column.

Step Six: Track Their Statements

Press releases and “Dear Colleague” letters contain valuable information that can impact your legislative strategy. Members announce their policy positions and recent actions using a press release and rally their colleagues’ support in support of or against current and proposed legislation. It’s critical you know where legislators stand on your issues and their intentions. As above, add a “1” to this column if they are talking favorably or neutrally about your issue.

Step Seven: Relationship Mapping

The last step to identifying the right members to target is mapping relationships. Look beyond your issue areas to understand:
  • Who they most frequently work with?
  • Who they sponsor legislation with?
  • Which members co-sponsor / vote with your existing champions most frequently?
  • Who they interact with on social media?
Use relationship information to make informed and targeted asks of your existing champions and know who in the chamber they can provide introductions to (or better yet, persuade) future champions. Once you identify who your current champions work with most frequently, add “1s” in their respective column. Now that you’ve populated and completed your worksheet, use the last column as a total. Add together each row. The larger totals will show members you who care about the issue, are already active on the issue or have the potential to care. Sort this total column to identify who you should be targeting as you expand your legislative coalition. [post_title] => Seven Steps to Identify Legislative Champions [post_excerpt] => Pushing legislative priorities on Capitol Hill? Chances are you already have a list of go-to members who consistently support your policy positions. But how can you be sure you are targeting the most relevant members and aren’t missing any engagement opportunities? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => finding-legislative-champions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-01 19:16:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-01 19:16:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://marketing-staging.quorum.us/resources/finding-legislative-champions/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [queried_object_id] => 1695 [request] => SELECT wp_posts.* FROM wp_posts WHERE 1=1 AND wp_posts.post_name = 'finding-legislative-champions' AND wp_posts.post_type = 'resources' ORDER BY wp_posts.post_date DESC [posts] => Array ( [0] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1695 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-10-06 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-06 00:00:00 [post_content] => Pushing legislative priorities on the Hill? Chances are you already have a list of go-to members who consistently support your policy positions. But how can you be sure you are targeting the most relevant members and aren’t missing any engagement opportunities? The key to building and sustaining support for your legislative priorities and successfully influencing the legislative process means knowing not only who your champions are, but which members should be champions and which members could be champions. Here are eight steps to identify and target legislative champions using quantitative data.

Step One: Create a Spreadsheet

You’ll want to create a spreadsheet with the names of all 100 Senators and 435 Representatives in the U.S. Congress in column “A”. Pro Tip: Start your list in column “A”, row 2 so there is room for labels across the top of your spreadsheet.

Step Two: Identify Key Committees

List out the name of each committee you’ve identified as being important along the top of your spreadsheet. Use Congress.gov to find committees. Still using Congress.gov, find the members of each key committee you’ve identified by clicking the links to each committee website. Mark the cells with a “1” in the column and the row corresponding to the committee and member.

Step Three: Explore the Data

Take your targeting farther with public statistics and your own organizational data to inform your legislative strategy.

The U.S. Census Bureau

Use the American Community Survey to find statistics on educational attainment, unemployment, health insurance rates, racial and socioeconomic breakdowns, and information about occupation for every congressional district in the United States. When aggregated, this data can show which members have constituents affected by an issue, which can be used to persuade legislators.

Organizational Data

Don’t forget to use your organization's own membership, stakeholder, or corporate databases to map your presence within congressional districts and identify which members represent the districts your supporters call home (and where you can rally supporters to engage on your behalf).

Step Four: Find Who's Active

Take a look at which elected officials have historically voted or cosponsored in favor of your positions, who introduces the most bills on the issue, who is most effective at getting bills out of committee, and who is already talking about the issue. Mark these members with “1s” in the corresponding columns and rows.

Step Five: Monitor Social Media

Elected officials take to social media to talk about things they care about-- sometimes things they haven’t actively supported legislatively. Track what they are saying using these tools. If they’re talking positively about your issue, add a “1” to that column.

Step Six: Track Their Statements

Press releases and “Dear Colleague” letters contain valuable information that can impact your legislative strategy. Members announce their policy positions and recent actions using a press release and rally their colleagues’ support in support of or against current and proposed legislation. It’s critical you know where legislators stand on your issues and their intentions. As above, add a “1” to this column if they are talking favorably or neutrally about your issue.

Step Seven: Relationship Mapping

The last step to identifying the right members to target is mapping relationships. Look beyond your issue areas to understand:
  • Who they most frequently work with?
  • Who they sponsor legislation with?
  • Which members co-sponsor / vote with your existing champions most frequently?
  • Who they interact with on social media?
Use relationship information to make informed and targeted asks of your existing champions and know who in the chamber they can provide introductions to (or better yet, persuade) future champions. Once you identify who your current champions work with most frequently, add “1s” in their respective column. Now that you’ve populated and completed your worksheet, use the last column as a total. Add together each row. The larger totals will show members you who care about the issue, are already active on the issue or have the potential to care. Sort this total column to identify who you should be targeting as you expand your legislative coalition. [post_title] => Seven Steps to Identify Legislative Champions [post_excerpt] => Pushing legislative priorities on Capitol Hill? Chances are you already have a list of go-to members who consistently support your policy positions. But how can you be sure you are targeting the most relevant members and aren’t missing any engagement opportunities? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => finding-legislative-champions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-01 19:16:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-01 19:16:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://marketing-staging.quorum.us/resources/finding-legislative-champions/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 1 [current_post] => -1 [in_the_loop] => [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 1695 [post_author] => 1 [post_date] => 2017-10-06 00:00:00 [post_date_gmt] => 2017-10-06 00:00:00 [post_content] => Pushing legislative priorities on the Hill? Chances are you already have a list of go-to members who consistently support your policy positions. But how can you be sure you are targeting the most relevant members and aren’t missing any engagement opportunities? The key to building and sustaining support for your legislative priorities and successfully influencing the legislative process means knowing not only who your champions are, but which members should be champions and which members could be champions. Here are eight steps to identify and target legislative champions using quantitative data.

Step One: Create a Spreadsheet

You’ll want to create a spreadsheet with the names of all 100 Senators and 435 Representatives in the U.S. Congress in column “A”. Pro Tip: Start your list in column “A”, row 2 so there is room for labels across the top of your spreadsheet.

Step Two: Identify Key Committees

List out the name of each committee you’ve identified as being important along the top of your spreadsheet. Use Congress.gov to find committees. Still using Congress.gov, find the members of each key committee you’ve identified by clicking the links to each committee website. Mark the cells with a “1” in the column and the row corresponding to the committee and member.

Step Three: Explore the Data

Take your targeting farther with public statistics and your own organizational data to inform your legislative strategy.

The U.S. Census Bureau

Use the American Community Survey to find statistics on educational attainment, unemployment, health insurance rates, racial and socioeconomic breakdowns, and information about occupation for every congressional district in the United States. When aggregated, this data can show which members have constituents affected by an issue, which can be used to persuade legislators.

Organizational Data

Don’t forget to use your organization's own membership, stakeholder, or corporate databases to map your presence within congressional districts and identify which members represent the districts your supporters call home (and where you can rally supporters to engage on your behalf).

Step Four: Find Who's Active

Take a look at which elected officials have historically voted or cosponsored in favor of your positions, who introduces the most bills on the issue, who is most effective at getting bills out of committee, and who is already talking about the issue. Mark these members with “1s” in the corresponding columns and rows.

Step Five: Monitor Social Media

Elected officials take to social media to talk about things they care about-- sometimes things they haven’t actively supported legislatively. Track what they are saying using these tools. If they’re talking positively about your issue, add a “1” to that column.

Step Six: Track Their Statements

Press releases and “Dear Colleague” letters contain valuable information that can impact your legislative strategy. Members announce their policy positions and recent actions using a press release and rally their colleagues’ support in support of or against current and proposed legislation. It’s critical you know where legislators stand on your issues and their intentions. As above, add a “1” to this column if they are talking favorably or neutrally about your issue.

Step Seven: Relationship Mapping

The last step to identifying the right members to target is mapping relationships. Look beyond your issue areas to understand:
  • Who they most frequently work with?
  • Who they sponsor legislation with?
  • Which members co-sponsor / vote with your existing champions most frequently?
  • Who they interact with on social media?
Use relationship information to make informed and targeted asks of your existing champions and know who in the chamber they can provide introductions to (or better yet, persuade) future champions. Once you identify who your current champions work with most frequently, add “1s” in their respective column. Now that you’ve populated and completed your worksheet, use the last column as a total. Add together each row. The larger totals will show members you who care about the issue, are already active on the issue or have the potential to care. Sort this total column to identify who you should be targeting as you expand your legislative coalition. [post_title] => Seven Steps to Identify Legislative Champions [post_excerpt] => Pushing legislative priorities on Capitol Hill? Chances are you already have a list of go-to members who consistently support your policy positions. But how can you be sure you are targeting the most relevant members and aren’t missing any engagement opportunities? [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => finding-legislative-champions [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-06-01 19:16:53 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-06-01 19:16:53 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://marketing-staging.quorum.us/resources/finding-legislative-champions/ [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => resources [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 1 [max_num_pages] => 0 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => 1 [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => 1 [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => 24e8bd8661fbad26e65bc6bd6bc7da70 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
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Seven Steps to Identify Legislative Champions

Seven Steps to Identify Legislative Champions

Pushing legislative priorities on the Hill? Chances are you already have a list of go-to members who consistently support your policy positions. But how can you be sure you are targeting the most relevant members and aren’t missing any engagement opportunities? The key to building and sustaining support for your legislative priorities and successfully influencing the legislative process means knowing not only who your champions are, but which members should be champions and which members could be champions. Here are eight steps to identify and target legislative champions using quantitative data.

Step One: Create a Spreadsheet

You’ll want to create a spreadsheet with the names of all 100 Senators and 435 Representatives in the U.S. Congress in column “A”. Pro Tip: Start your list in column “A”, row 2 so there is room for labels across the top of your spreadsheet.

Step Two: Identify Key Committees

List out the name of each committee you’ve identified as being important along the top of your spreadsheet. Use Congress.gov to find committees. Still using Congress.gov, find the members of each key committee you’ve identified by clicking the links to each committee website. Mark the cells with a “1” in the column and the row corresponding to the committee and member.

Step Three: Explore the Data

Take your targeting farther with public statistics and your own organizational data to inform your legislative strategy.

The U.S. Census Bureau

Use the American Community Survey to find statistics on educational attainment, unemployment, health insurance rates, racial and socioeconomic breakdowns, and information about occupation for every congressional district in the United States. When aggregated, this data can show which members have constituents affected by an issue, which can be used to persuade legislators.

Organizational Data

Don’t forget to use your organization’s own membership, stakeholder, or corporate databases to map your presence within congressional districts and identify which members represent the districts your supporters call home (and where you can rally supporters to engage on your behalf).

Step Four: Find Who’s Active

Take a look at which elected officials have historically voted or cosponsored in favor of your positions, who introduces the most bills on the issue, who is most effective at getting bills out of committee, and who is already talking about the issue. Mark these members with “1s” in the corresponding columns and rows.

Step Five: Monitor Social Media

Elected officials take to social media to talk about things they care about– sometimes things they haven’t actively supported legislatively. Track what they are saying using these tools. If they’re talking positively about your issue, add a “1” to that column.

Step Six: Track Their Statements

Press releases and “Dear Colleague” letters contain valuable information that can impact your legislative strategy. Members announce their policy positions and recent actions using a press release and rally their colleagues’ support in support of or against current and proposed legislation. It’s critical you know where legislators stand on your issues and their intentions. As above, add a “1” to this column if they are talking favorably or neutrally about your issue.

Step Seven: Relationship Mapping

The last step to identifying the right members to target is mapping relationships. Look beyond your issue areas to understand:

  • Who they most frequently work with?
  • Who they sponsor legislation with?
  • Which members co-sponsor / vote with your existing champions most frequently?
  • Who they interact with on social media?

Use relationship information to make informed and targeted asks of your existing champions and know who in the chamber they can provide introductions to (or better yet, persuade) future champions. Once you identify who your current champions work with most frequently, add “1s” in their respective column.

Now that you’ve populated and completed your worksheet, use the last column as a total. Add together each row. The larger totals will show members you who care about the issue, are already active on the issue or have the potential to care. Sort this total column to identify who you should be targeting as you expand your legislative coalition.